Yum - churros!

Potosi Travel Blog

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San Lorenzo, finest carved facade in Potosi

After a continental breakfast (included) I spend the morning relaxing, sorting out emails and trying to catch up on blogs.    I digress for a moment here to say that writing my blog and including photos takes a considerable amount of time, which means that I just don’t get time to write “casual” emails, so apologies to those who haven’t had responses recently.  It may be easier when I get to Sucre, but then again, I thought that when I got here it would be easier.  Anyway, back to Potosi; while they clean my room I sit in the courtyard and continue working on my puter.  At 12:30 I ask the receptionist for directions to the best bus company so I can book a ticket to Sucre on Sunday; I follow her markings on a map.  When I get there, of course it’s closed for lunch.

Statue of Indian mining slave
  I wander back to La Plata (The Silver) Café where I had dinner last night and have a couple of glasses of white wine and yummy churros…and thought of Glynes.  35BOB, AUD5.02.

 

Most of the streets here are very narrow and are one way, with one street going one direction and the next going in the other direction.  I haven’t worked out the road rules here or who has right of way, but I think that it goes something like this:  Pedestrians have no rights, if two cars get to a corner at the same time, whoever honked their horn first has right of way.  I noticed the horn honking in Santiago, but it’s not a patch on these guys.  They honk their horns at every intersection unless they’re going very slowly and/or stuck in traffic.

Yes, the bus company has definitely gone to lunch
  They often force their way through, following the car or bus in front.  If you’re not in the moving convoy, it’s just too bad and you have to honk your horn and try to break the rhythm.  The drivers are loathe to use their indicators, which, as a pedestrian, makes it a bit like Russian roulette, trying to guess which way they are going to go.

 

Marco said that two days in Potosi was too long, but he’s wrong.  It’s fun just to wander and get lost and find different places.  The streets are much busier today, as yesterday was Corpus Christi holiday.

 

And now for the afternoon’s excitement.  I decide to buy a stamp for a postcard to the only person I know who doesn’t have internet access.

Hospital
  I think I’m in the right area and go in and ask; no, it’s further up the street.  I go further up the street; yes it’s upstairs, turn to the right.  I go upstairs and turn right; no it’s downstairs and to the right.  Reminds me of all those Spanish lessons when we used to practise giving directions to each other; a la derecha, a la izquierda.  I go downstairs, totally confused.  I finally accost an ordinary man in the street, not an “official” as all the others have been and he gives me the correct directions; sale de la puerta, gira a la izquierda, gira a la izquierda en la esquina y esta en esa cuadra en la izquierda.   Well, that’s basically what he says.

 

So I enter the post office and ask for a stamp for Australia.  Europe?  No, Australia.

University
  Austria?  No, Australia.  The stamp is 10.5BOB.  I give her 50BOB.  She wants the .5BOB.  I tell her, sorry, I only have big notes from the cajero automatico (ATM).  I desperately need to change the big notes; you only get 100BOBs and a maximum of one 50BOB out of the ATMs.  If the post office doesn’t have change, then who does, except for the banks of course.  She goes away and comes back about 5 minutes later with the change, apologizing, and I apologize too.  I’ve got my stamp and my change and everybody’s happy.  NB  While I was waiting for the change I heard a sound that I have not heard for a very long time, coming from the area where they do money  orders.
Top of main plaza, Potosi
  It was a manual typewriter, with the ringing sound at the end of each line. 

 

I went to the Casa National de Moneda (old Mint/now Museum) at 2:30 but there wasn't any tour in English as there weren't enough people, so I was told to come back at 10:30 the next morning.   I spend the rest of the afternoon wandering around Potosi, getting lost, finding out where I am, you know, the usual drill.  However I do return successfully to the bus company and bought my ticket for Sunday.  I’ve learned now to ask which side of the bus has the best scenery.  I decide to try Cherry’s café for tea.  I buy one of the worst burgers I’ve ever had and a bottle of warm lemonade.  12BOB, AUD1.72.

 

Return to the hotel and try to download a video (unsuccessfully) to this website, fiddle around with the blog and photos and there’s 4 hours gone!

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San Lorenzo, finest carved facade …
San Lorenzo, finest carved facade…
Statue of Indian mining slave
Statue of Indian mining slave
Yes, the bus company has definitel…
Yes, the bus company has definite…
Hospital
Hospital
University
University
Top of main plaza, Potosi
Top of main plaza, Potosi
Street scene
Street scene
Street stalls
Street stalls
SA Bernardo Colonial Church?
SA Bernardo Colonial Church?
SA Bernardo Colonial Church?  Note…
SA Bernardo Colonial Church? Not…
Street scene
Street scene
Street scene
Street scene
Not sure - but the taxman is invol…
Not sure - but the taxman is invo…
Potosi
photo by: Biedjee