Finally..............a blockade.

Sucre Travel Blog

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Flower stalls outside cemetery

After L left around 12:15 I rang for a clean towel as they’d hung the dirty towels back on the rail.  After having a shower I went down and got the receptionist to come up and see my room.  The assistant manager isn’t there between 12 and 3.  The room wasn’t being cleaned properly.  No clean sheets since I arrived and they didn’t even bother to make the bed properly, I can write my name in the dust on the furniture, dirty basin etc.  So I asked her to make sure that the sheets were changed, clean towels, clean room. 

 

Got a taxi to the General Cemetery as recommended by L; however it didn’t open until two so I wandered around for half an hour.  L had said that there were tours, but of course these were not in English and no literature in English, but I did manage to get a pamphlet in Spanish which was useful.

Sucre General Cemetery
  The cemetery is quite beautiful on the whole, with lots of shady trees.  Bolivia being a Catholic country, it is of course very much in the Catholic way as you can see from the photos.

 

After that I decided to go to the Glorieta Castle, also recommended by L.  Went to a taxi outside the cemetery and asked the driver how much?  Pretends he doesn’t hear and gets into the cab to drive me (that way he can name the price when we get there).  So I asked him again; 20 bolivianos.  I look disinterested; 15 bolivianos.  OK.  We drive off to the Castle, which is on the road to Potosi.  The taxi driver is very friendly and talks slowly enough that we can have a reasonable conversation.

Cemetery
  I’ve discovered the one thing that all taxi drivers in Bolivia know about Australia; canguros.  I’ll let you work that one out.

 

About half way to the Glorieta we come across a number of trucks parked across the road.  The taxi tries to drive around the trucks but isn’t able to.  It’s one of the infamous Bolivian blockades, particularly popular in the Sucre area.  I think it’s against the taxes on trucks by the Morales government.  Today we won’t be going to the Glorieta.  The blockade appears very good natured, although obviously it is very inconvenient for some people. The blockade may stay for a day or two and there's no way for getting from Potosi to Sucre by road.

 

I’ve heard of the Recoleta Convent and Museum, so ask to go there instead.

Mausoleum for petroleum workers, established by company.
  How much?  30 Bolivianos.  Too much.  25?  OK.  He takes me to the Recoleta.  Built in 1600, it boasts a tree which is approximately 1,400 years old and an orange grove with trees brought from Spain.  The tour is in Spanish, some interesting artefacts, but those very dreary, dark, religious paintings.  After the visit (BOB10) I wander around the front plaza and there is a school to one side.  There are excellent views of Sucre, although it is to the west and there is the late afternoon sun.  As always the sun is shining.  I haven’t seen a cloud since I arrived in Sucre.  There is no wind, but there is no pollution as the city is too small and doesn’t have the industries that would contribute to pollution.

 

I ponder on the fact that, once again, the Catholic Church has managed to base their property on one of the prime pieces of high land in the town, much as they have done in other countries, including Australia.

Jewish section of Cemetery
  After looking around the area I catch a taxi back to the main plaza.

 

In town I buy a Fridosita hamburger at one of the street stalls in a plaza close to the hotel and it’s really nice, much better than the ghastly one I had in Potosi.  BOB5, AUD0.72.  I also buy some sugar-coated peanuts for BOB1 and they’re yummy too.  My hotel room is clean, looks much better than it has for days.  The band and dancers are in the streets again and this time there are more people around and more dancers.  There are also lots of very loud firecrackers; legal in Bolivia.

 

I want to buy a present for L and I decide to get something like a Teflon coated saucepan.

..and the award for the largest Mausoleum goes to past President (1880s) Gregorio Pacheco,
  There is a place close by that is called Francesa or something similar and it has lots of nice imported kitchen things but the prices are as much, or more than in Oz.  There is another shop close to the hotel but they don’t have what I want.  I end up going to the very back of the market and buy a saucepan that could also be used as a frypan and has a lid BOB150, AUD22.  It comes from Brazil and is very good quality and I would use it myself, so I think that L will like it.  I also buy some flour, a tin of tuna, a tin of sweet corn and a small packet of milk powder.  L hasn't heard of white sauce, so I'm going to tell her how to make a tuna mornay and other variations, including cheese macaroni.  Unlike most women in Bolivia, she has done very little cooking and is learning now.

 

I go back to the room very tired, particularly my left foot, which has to do extra work these days.
Poor are buried in mass graves, but these are temporary monuments which they can have for a year or so.
  The band is very loud; sounds like it’s in the passage.  There are whistles and firecrackers.  I finally get to sleep after midnight.  L tells me the next day that the music went until 2 am.
bschooled says:
Thank you for writing this blog, I am planning to go to Sucre and Fox Academy later this year and I have been trying to do as much research as possible...this is the most information I have found to date!
Posted on: Feb 28, 2009
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Flower stalls outside cemetery
Flower stalls outside cemetery
Sucre General Cemetery
Sucre General Cemetery
Cemetery
Cemetery
Mausoleum for petroleum workers, e…
Mausoleum for petroleum workers, …
Jewish section of Cemetery
Jewish section of Cemetery
..and the award for the largest Ma…
..and the award for the largest M…
Poor are buried in mass graves, bu…
Poor are buried in mass graves, b…
Blockade
Blockade
Truck blockade, with the taxi driv…
Truck blockade, with the taxi dri…
Truck blockade outskirts of Sucre,…
Truck blockade outskirts of Sucre…
Recoleta
Recoleta
Recoleta school
Recoleta school
The Recoleta Convent, courtyard
The Recoleta Convent, courtyard
View from Recoleta plaza
View from Recoleta plaza
Sucre
photo by: AndySD