ONCE, SAN TELMO & EVITA MUSEUM

Buenos Aires Travel Blog

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ONCE

LAST DAY IN BA!!!!



It was about 9am, we had breakfast with some of the people who were going to the “LE TIGRE” excursion.  We brought our map to plan to visit ONCE, it is the Jewish neighborhood of BA.  It is the largest jewish community in South America. 

 

The concierge said that the shops are closed on Sundays which is strange because it is not Shabbat.  I can understand on Saturdays. That is why I plan to visit on Sunday.  I was confused about this. No matter I wanted to go there anyway to see the neighborhood. Even the taxi driver warned us. which is nice but, mum and I did not plan to go shopping. We wanted to just walk around the neighborhood.

 

Yeah just what we expected, it was deserted.
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There were 3 synagogues nearby.  I wanted to go see if they have unique mezuzahs. The only shops were open were the Judaic book shop and kosher deli and market.  There was a synagogue nearby.  I asked if I could come in. they asked if I was jewish first. Then said they are no tourists allowed. I could understand that.  I just took photo on the outside.

 

I can even find the name to the 3 others on the internet.  I found Judaic book store. my mum and I hung out and talk to the store owners. They have beautiful gifts and children’s jewish stories in Spanish.  i asked why many of the stores are closed on Sunday. They said Argentineans believes Sunday in the day’s rest. However, some jewih owned store are open on Saturday which is during Shabbat, unless they are open after sundown.
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That I can understand.

 

We needed to be back at the hotel to meet up with john and ken to go have lunch and shop at San Telmo.  It was another $10 cab ride back to the hotel.  it was such I gorgeous day in BA. I wish I could change my top. We unfortunately checked out and our luggage was in a storage room.

 

When we arrive I saw a familiar faces it was the father and son team from CANADA, George and Art.  They came up to all frazzled. George and Art were a victim of professional pick pocketing.  They were all covered in mustard and ketchup. They took their wallet, removed all the money, put the wallet back in the back pocket and also buttoned it.  WOW that is smooth if you did not know where pick pocketed. Between Art and George, they lost about $300 dollars.
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  Al least their passport was not stolen. They both warned us since we were going to San Telmo today.  My mum was freaked out about that. I was not worried about it because WE DON’T LOOK AMERICANS. I never have problems when I am in a foreign country.  I am always aware of my surroundings where ever I go. 

 

 It makes me mad with people say that they don’t like the French.  Do you know the term “UGLY AMERICAN??!?!?!”  Americans who expect everybody to speak English where ever you go and have the same social rules as Americans.

 

Anyway, I am going off tangent here.  I felt sorry for them but they seems to not let that bother them.  when I travel I try not to have a purse. I like to keep my money around my leg.
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I called John and Ken from the lobby phone that we are downstairs and ready.  We warned them about what happened.  then Ken shared that a woman from Sweden from our boat got her gold necklace snatched from her neck while she walking down the street near the hotel.  WOW that is INSANE!!!!

 

I never wear anything lavish when I travel. You don’t need to flash your bling bling. No one knows you or cares. I am very low key when I travel I pack very few clothes.  We all jumped on a taxi to San Telmo. If it was me I would be on the subway. The subway station is near the hotel and the stops are near the places where I have been.

 

We were dropped off at the beginning of SanTelmo.  There were vendors in tents in every corner. We turned to the right where locals were selling crafts.
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I found coin purses for $2. Perfect for souvenirs for my friends, I was debating to buy a yerba mate cup for me. However, you can buy the kit in whole foods.  There was a guy that made sculptures from chalk.  He had the Simpsons, KISS, beetles, and so on. he was saying that Matt Groening, creator of the Simpsons bought many of this pieces.

 

We walked to the other side of the street where there are plenty of antique shops. My mum and John and into that, they spend the time going in a out antique shop row. I was taking photos of the vendors selling freshly squeezed orange juice, popcorn balls on a stick with prunes and popcorn. What is the fascination with prunes?!?!!??!  There were locals dancing the tango on the street. I was recording it. there were was an old lady that caught my eye, she was playing the drums and she did not want to have her picture taken.
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  She had a sign “SHOW ME THE MONEY”  there were 3 kids in the middle of the alley playing an accordion….an accordion!!! I gave them 50 cents. One of them said 2 pesos um hello that is same amount HAHAHAHAHA.

 

Locals are learning quickly if you want to take a photo you need to have some change. I keep forgetting to get some change. There were many funny moments on the street. We finally entered the heart of the famous market. WOW is was overwhelming. There were a mixture of arts and crafts and “garage sale” stuff. However, you can unique stuff. You can find vinyl records from the 50s and 60s, old toys, old dishes, old clothes.  I started to get hot. The heat was pounding our head. We walked for about an hour. I took many wonderful photos here. We ended up eating a restaurant called TODO MUNDO.
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“SEE REVIEW BELOW. What caught my eye was that you can eat upstairs and see the view of the market. I was a very busy restaurant. We were seated near a topless poster of Madonna HAHAHAHA. I had to take a photo near her.  I loved people watching here,  plenty of locals just being  have a good time on a Sunday.

 

Afterwards we plan to take a cab to the Eva Peron museum which is in the Palermo area near the zoo.  Which is going to be about a $20 taxi fare, it is in the opposite side of the city, we were lucky it was open on a Sunday, Most museums are not open on Sundays, we walked to a main street to find a taxi.  We needed to be back at the hotel by 5:30pm for the airport shuttle to drop us off at the airport; our flight was at 9:20pm.

 

We had plenty of time, it was only 2pm.
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the museum is not very large. Thank goodness there was no traffic of some sort. We arrived at the museum, it was her shelter for woman and children to come and to relax and it was converted into her museum. On July 26, 2002, fifty years to the day after Evita’s death, her grandniece, Cristina Alvarez Rodriguez, inaugurated the Evita Museum in Buenos Aires.

 

We spend about 2hrs, just reading and watching her speeches. We were lucky on Sunday’s the museum is free. I would suggest coming here.  It was perfect timing, it was almost 5pm, we jumped on taxi back to our hotel. Where we ran into other people who were leaving the same time as we were, they were all sitting at the comfy sofas near the elevators.
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  We all shared our day.

 

I have met very nice and cultured people on this voyage.  i have exchanged info who the ones I wanted to keep in touch with.  I have many contacts in Norway and to Spitsbergen. One of my dreams to play with the polar bears.

 

I bid farewell to my new friends and I hope we can all keep in touch in the future. some of them I would like to travel with some day. this voyage was very different than the others. The people, the vibe, and the level of class. I do enjoy meeting different people.

 

I AM OFF TO BATTLE THE AIRPORT LINES!!!!!



HISTORY OF "ONCE" and "SAN TELMO"



Once (on-say) (Buenos Aires)

Eleven is the name under which meets an area of the district Balvanera in Buenos Aires.
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It is a neighborhood "unofficial" in the city of Buenos Aires, being perhaps the best known of the unofficial neighborhoods, to the point where many people believe that Eleven is a neighborhood of the city.



The Eleven is characterized by its many shops and offers low prices, and covers several commercial areas (Buenos Aires) Eleven is the name under which meets an area of the district Balvanera in Buenos Aires. It is a neighborhood "unofficial" in the city of Buenos Aires, being perhaps the best known of the unofficial neighborhoods, to the point where many people believe that Eleven is a neighborhood of the city.



The Eleven is characterized by its many shops and offers low prices, and covers several commercial areas. Its name comes from the terminal rail in the center of the area in September Eleven, which in turn comes from the Sept.
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11, 1852, the date on which Buenos Aires was separated from the rest of Argentina.



Eleven is characterized by the presence of a large Jewish community. The Jews in this area are traditionally fabric manufacturers and owners of shops.It houses a number of synagogues, Jewish schools and clubs. Apoximadamente since 2000, due to the migration of many Jews in Buenos Aires to Israel mainly by the economic crisis, its population declined significantly in the Eleven.



Also, according to recent demographic changes of Eleven, there are many immigrant Koreans and Peruvians. Its name comes from the terminal rail in the center of the area in September Eleven, which in turn comes from the Sept. 11, 1852, the date on which Buenos Aires was separated from the rest of Argentina.
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Argentina is the second largest nation in Latin America and boasts the largest Jewish community in the region. From an open door policy of immigration to the harboring of Nazi war criminals, Argentina’s Jews have faced periods of peaceful coexistence and periods of intense anti-Semitism.


History


After the expulsion from Spain in 1492, conversos (or secret Jews) settled in Argentina. Most of these immigrants assimilated into the general population and, by the mid 1800's, few Jews were left in Argentina.

 

Argentina gained its independence from Spain in 1810. Bernardino Rivadavia, Argentina’s first president, gave support to policies that promoted freedom of immigration and respect for human rights, i.e., he officially abolished the Inquisition.
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In this atmosphere of tolerance, a second wave of Jewish immigration began in the mid-19th century with Jewish immigrants arriving from western Europe, especially from France.

 

In 1860, the first Jewish wedding was recorded in Buenos Aires. A couple of years later, a minyan  met for the High Holiday services and, eventually, the minyan became the Congregacion Israelita de la Republica.

 

In the late 19th century, a third wave of immigration fleeing poverty and pogroms in Russia, and other Eastern Europe countries, moved to Argentina because of its open door policy of immigration. These Jews became known as "Rusos" and became active in Argentinian society.

 

In 1889, 824 Russian Jews arrived in Argentina on the S.S. Weser and became gauchos (Argentine cowboys).
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The gauchos bought land and established a colony, which they named Moiseville. Due to lack of funding, the gauchos appealed to Baron Maurice de Hirsch for funds and the Baron subsequently founded the Jewish Colonization Association. During its heyday, the Association owned more than 600,000 hectares of land, populated by more than 200,000 Jews. While many of these cooperative ranches are now owned by non-Jews, Jews continue to run some of the properties.

 

Between 1906 and 1912, Jewish immigration increased at a rate of 13,000 immigrants per year. Most of the immigrants were Ashkenazi Jews from Europe, but a number of Sephardic Jews from Morocco and the Ottoman Empire also settled in Argentina. By 1920, more than 150,000 Jews were living in Argentina.

 

Anti-Semitic attacks against Jews were infrequent in Argentina before World War I.
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Following the Russian Revolution, between 1918 and 1930, anti-revolutionary feelings developed into full-blown anti-Semitism against the Rusos. From January 7-13, 1919, a general strike in Buenos Aires lead to a pogrom against the Jews. Many were beaten and had their property burned and looted.

 

Despite anti-Semitic actions against the Jews and increasing xenophobia, Jews became involved in most sectors of Argentine society. Still they were unable to be work in the government or military and so many became farmers, peddlers, artisans and shopkeepers. Cultural and religious organizations flourished and a Yiddish press and theater opened in Buenos Aires, as well as a Jewish hospital and a number of Zionist organizations.


 

Juan Peron’s rise to power in 1946 worried many Jews because of he was a Nazi sympathizer with fascist leanings.
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Peron halted Jewish immigration to Argentina, introduced Catholic religious instruction in public schools and allowed Argentina to become a haven for fleeing Nazis. On the other hand, Peron also expressed sympathy for Jewish rights and established diplomatic relations with Israel in 1949. Since then, more than 45,000 Jews have immigrated to Israel from Argentina.

 

Peron was overthrown in 1955, which was followed by another wave of anti-Semitism. In 1960, Israeli agents abducted Adolf Eichmann from a Buenos Aires suburb. The Eichmann trial in Jerusalem, in April 1961, aroused further anti-Jewish sentiment in Argentina.

 

Argentina was under military rule between 1976 and 1983. During this period, Jews were increasingly targeted for kidnapping and torture by the ruling junta; about 1,000 of the 9,000 known victims of state terrorism were Jews.
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According to the Jerusalem Post, the Israeli government had a special agreement with the Argentine government to allow Jews arrested for political crimes to immigrate to Israel. Once the military’s power waned in Argentina, anti-Semitic attacks also declined.


Present-Day Argentina


In 1983, Raul Alfonsin was democratically elected as president of Argentina. Alfonsin enjoyed the support of the Jewish population and placed many Jews in high positions.

 

Carlos Saul Menem was elected president in 1989, his Arab origin and support of Peron worried the Jews, however, he did not follow in Peron’s footsteps. Menem appointed many Jews to his government, visited Israel a number of times and offered to help mediate the Israeli-Arab peace process. After a Jewish cemetery was desecrated in Buenos Aires, Menem immediately expressed his outrage to the Jewish community and, within a week, apprehended those responsible.
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President Menem also ordered the release of files relating to Argentina’s role in serving as a haven for Nazi war criminals. A law against racism and anti-Semitism passed in the Argentine parliament in 1988.



Despite Menem’s sympathetic policies and a democratic regime, the Jews of Argentina were targets of two major terrorist attacks. The Israeli Embassy was bombed in April 1992, killing 32 people. In 1994, the Jewish community headquarters (AMIA) in Buenos Aires was bombed, killing 87 people and wounding more than 100 others. The community’s archives were destroyed in the bombing and the event left many emotionally scarred. Though Iran was suspected of involvement, with the help of Argentine police, the culprits have never been found. In 2005, an Argentine prosecutor said the AMIA bombing was carried out by a 21-year-old Lebanese suicide bomber who belonged to Hezbollah.
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Jews are active in all sectors of Argentine society and many are prominent figures in the arts, film, music and journalism. Some influential Argentine Jews include: writer Jacobo Timmerman, owner of a local newspaper who campaigned for human rights; Rene Epelbaum, who founded a protest group for mothers of political prisoners; pianist Daniel Barenboim, and Cesar Milstein, the 1984 Nobel Prize recipient in medicine.

 

Throughout Argentina’s history, Jews have held a large stake in the country’s fur, textile, chemical, electronics and auto industries. Both Banco Mercantile and Banco Comercial were founded by Jews. On the other hand, Jews are still absent from the high ranks of the military, foreign ministry and judiciary.

 

Poverty in Argentina is on the rise, affecting Argentina’s middle class, which is losing its small and medium sized businesses.
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Many Jewish business owners have lost their shops and are unable to pay membership or tuition fees to local Jewish institutions and synagogues. These communal institutions now face declining membership and budgets to maintain their activities and services. A much larger percent of the bugets of these oranizations now has to go to emergancy economic relief. In response to the economic decline and lack of funds, the Joint Distribution Committee and the Jewish Agency are training new, young lay leaders to rebuild the community and run the local institutions.

 

The economic situation has caused about 10,000 Jews to leave Argentina in the last few years. About 6,000 emigrated to Israel. Jewish community leaders are hoping that the election of a new presdient will bring economic stability and cease emigration .
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Jewish Community

 
Argentina’s Jewish community numbers more than 250,000; of that 200,000 live in Buenos Aires, 20,000 in Rosario, 9,000 in Cordoba and 20,000 in other small, rural communities, including some areas in the Sante Fe province. There are also signifcant numbers of Jews in the cities of Concordia, La Plata, and Mar del Plata. The majority of these Jews are Ashkenazi, about 15 percent are Sephardic. Nearly all the Jews speak Spanish �" Ladino and Yiddish are rarely spoken. The community is not growing and many young Jews are immigrating to other countries.

 

Argentina’s Jews have numerous Jewish community organizations.
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The DAIA (Delegacion de Asociaciones Israelitas Argentinas) was founded in 1939 as the political arm of the Jewish community. The DAIA protects Jewish rights and represents the community in the government. Another organization, the AMIA, originally an Ashkenazic mutual-aid society that provided health and human services to Argentina’s Ashkenazi population, now serves the country's entire Jewish community.

 

Most of Argentina’s synagogues are traditional, lying somewhere between Conservative and Orthodox. Buenos Aires has 50 Orthodox synagogues, 21 Conservative synagogues and a few Reform synagogues. Most of the synagogues built before World War II are still in use today.

 

The Conservative movement became strong in Argentina in 1958 after Rabbi Marshall Meyer took control over Communidad Bet El, the country’s first Conservative synagogue, located in Buenos Aires.
His enthusiasm attracted many young adults. Meyer became involved politically, gathered information about political prisoners and published the material in the newspapers.

 

President Alfonsin appointed Meyer to a government commission that investigated the disappearances of Jews in the military regime. In 1984, Marshall left the community and moved to New York, where he currently serves as the Rabbi for B’nei Jeshrun, another vanguard synagogue in the Conservative movement.

 

Today, Communidad Bet El also has a day school and attendance on a regular Saturday morning reaches up to 800 worshipers.

 

Argentina boasts more than 70 Jewish educational institutions, including kindergartens, day schools, elementary and secondary schools.
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More than 60% of Jewish Argentine youth attend one of these institutions. In Buenos Aires alone, 17,000 Jewish children study in the Jewish educational system

 

Communities in other cities also have Jewish social clubs, Sociedad Hebraica for Ashkenazi Jews and Casa Sephardi for Sephardic Jews. Maccabe Sport Federation is also active in Argentina. Plays are performed in Yiddish, Spanish and Hebrew in a number of Jewish theaters across the country.

 

There are also 18 Jewish cemeteries located in Argentina, of those seven are still active. One can find Jewish cemeteries in Buenos Aires, Cordoba, Parana, La Plata, Colinas del Tiempo, Rosario and Sante Fe. La Tablada cemetery in Buenos Aires has been vandalized in anti-Semitic attacks in 1994. Bronze objects were stolen from more than 150 graves.
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While Argentina's Jewish population has many community outlets, one quarter of the population is living below the poverty line. Even well-educated young people are finding it next to impossible to find a job. There are groups in Argentina trying to irradicate this problem. Alianza Solidaria (started by the JDC) is an organization trying to fight poverty among Jews. The Tzedaka foundation is another organization that devotes its efforts solely to helping the impoverished Argentinian Jews.

 

Even those wealthier Jews who try to help the poor have been unable. In 1998, Banco Patricios collapsed, taking with it millions of Jewish dollars. The Banco Mayo also failed to help the situation as it too went bankrupt in 1999. Because of these circumstances, many once wealthy Jewish organizations are now unable to give funding to charity groups.
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AMIA, a major benefactor for social programs, is now trying to pay off a $26 million debt.

 

Much of Buenos Aires Jewish life centers around the Once district (pronounced on-say). One of Once’s well known synagogues is Yesod Hadat, founded in 1932 by Jews from Aleppo, Syria. It is located on Lavalle 2449.


Libertad


Once also has a Jewish cultural center, which hosts concerts, lectures and a high school, located at Sarmiento 2233. Other Jewish clubs include Hacoaj and C.A.S.A. Sefardita have a range of sports and cultural activities.

 

Argentina’s oldest synagogue, Congregacion Israelita de la Republica Argentina, is known as "Libertad" because it is located at Libertad 733 in Buenos Aires. The Libertad was dedicated in 1932 and houses a small Jewish museum, which a good collection of photographs and Jewish ritual objects.
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The Argentine branch of the Jewish Theological Seminary, the Conservative movement’s Rabbinical School, opened in 1962 in Buenos Aires and trains Conservative Rabbis from all over Argentina and Latin America. In 1992, the first woman was ordained by the seminary. The seminary acts as a center for interfaith dialogue, hosts a high school and a graduate school and offers adult education lessons and seminars for the community.

 

Buenos Aires has one of the world’s four remaining Yiddish daily newspapers, others are found in Paris, Tel Aviv and Birobidjan, in Siberia.

 

SAN TELMO

 

What is San Telmo?

 

San Telmo was traditionally a working-class neighborhood, and is one of the oldest areas in the city.
The early architecture of Buenos Aires is better preserved in San Telmo than it is in some other districts. As the city moves into the twenty-first century, San Telmo is reinventing itself as a hip, fun bohemian district with something for everyone.


Tango Shows


Buenos Aires is the home of the tango, that sweeping, passionate dance. Ask anyone in San Telmo, and they’ll tell you that the dance was born there (although you’ll get the same answer in La Boca, Barracas and other districts of the city). The best way to experience tango is by taking classes or going to a tango show. Tango shows take place in special restaurants, where you pay one price for a meal and an unforgettable display of dance and music. The tango dancers are artists and athletes, and the shows are marvelous.
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San Telmo has several restaurants specializing in tango shows: one of the best is El Viejo Almacén (at the intersection of Balcarce and Independencia streets).


Shopping


What’s a trip without some shopping? San Telmo is where you’ll want to go for antiques and handicrafts. The main street, Calle Defensa, is lined with antique shops. There are literally dozens of them, selling every sort of antique imaginable, from shiny old brass locks to books to old gaucho knives. There are some antique stalls in the San Telmo market as well. The best time to go is on Sundays, when Plaza Dorrego, a small park and the heart of San Telmo, fills up with even more antique vendors and gets packed with locals and tourists alike. On Saturdays and Sundays, Calle Defensa also features people selling locally made handicrafts as well as a small army of street performers and musicians.
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Nightlife and Restaurants


If there are two things that the people of Buenos Aires love, it’s good food and going out to party! San Telmo is a good place to find both. You’ll find several good restaurants scattered around the neighborhood, including the famous Desnivel (located at 858 Defensa street), a traditional Argentine steakhouse hugely popular with locals and visitors alike. The helpful waiters will assist you if you don't know the fine points of an Argentine steak feast! There are many bars in San Telmo as well, but be warned that the locals don’t tend to go out until midnight, and often stay out until dawn.

 

San Telmo (St. Peter Telmo Gonzalez) is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the city of Buenos Aires. Primitivamente se llamĂł Altos de San Pedro , y estaba poblado por los trabajadores del puerto.
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Was originally called Altos de San Pedro, and was inhabited by workers of the port. Junto con el cercano Monserrat fue el barrio más negro de Buenos Aires, llamándose " Barrio Sur ", en oposición al " Barrio Norte " de San Nicolás . Together with the nearby Montserrat was the most black of Buenos Aires, called "Barrio Sur", as opposed to the "Barrio Norte" of San Nicolas. Todavía pueden escucharse ritmos afro-rioplatenses como el candombe en sus calles. Can still hear rhythms of Afro-River Plate as candombe on their streets.

 

San Telmo is one of the best preserved areas within the ever-changing Buenos Aires, and is characterized by its colonial houses and streets, many of which are still paved with cobblestones. Entre las muchas atracciones que se pueden visitar en este barrio, se encuentran numerosas iglesias antiguas (como la de San Pedro Telmo), museos, tiendas de antigĂĽedades y una feria semipermanente de antigĂĽedades Feria de San Telmo en la plaza principal, Plaza Dorrego .
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Among the many attractions that can be visited in this neighborhood, there are many old churches (like that of St. Peter Telmo), museums, antique shops and an antiques fair semi Feria de San Telmo in the main square, Plaza Dorrego.

 

There are also activities related to tango and Candombe, both to local people as to the many tourists who visit the area.

 

On Saturday afternoons and Sundays throughout the day, the street becomes Defense pedestrian mall where you can enjoy street artists, puppeteers, magicians and living statues.

 

EVA PERON MUSEUM



On July 26, 2002, fifty years to the day after Evita’s death, her grandniece, Cristina Alvarez Rodriguez, inaugurated the Evita Museum in Buenos Aires.
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Museo Eva Peron Buenos Aires ArgentinaEvita, an icon whose historical importance spans two centuries, now has her own museum.

The Evita Museum is housed in a mansion constructed for the Carabassa family during the first decade of the 20th century. Architect Estanislao Pirovano gave the mansion its formal image which combines elements from both the Plateresque and Italian Renaissance styles.

This beautiful building was declared a National Historical Monument in 1999.

In 1948, the Fundación Eva Perón bought, restored and designated the mansion as Hogar de Tránsito (Temporary Home) #2, a shelter for women and children with no resources.

On July 18, 1948, Evita inaugurated El Hogar with these words, “The Temporary Home shelters those in need a nd those who have no home.
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.. for as long as necessary until work and a home can be found... .” Evita offered the women and children “an open door, a place set for them at the table, a clean bed,” as well as “consolation and motivation, encouragement and hope, faith and self-confidence.”

The walls of this building once echoed with the strong voice of Evita and the joyful voices of the women and children who found refuge in it. Now it houses the Museo Evita, a living museum where people can come to know, understand and appreciate the life of the most important woman of Argentine history.

Located at 2988 Lafinur Street in the Palermo neighborhood of Buenos Aires, the Evita Museum forms part of the cultural tourist trail of the City of Buenos Aires (together with the Decorative Art Museum, the National Fine Arts Museum, the Palais de Glace and the Latin American Art Museum).
EVA PERON MUSEUM


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SAN TELMO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
WOW!!!!
WOW!!!!
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
TODO MUNDO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
SAN TELMO
PALERMO
PALERMO
PALERMO
PALERMO
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
EVA PERON MUSEUM
Buenos Aires Hotels & Accommodations review
HORRIBLE SERVICE
i was not impressed with this hotel. this was a 5 star hotel on the 9 de julio ave. waling distance to shopping, conveient stores and restaurants. the… read entire review
Buenos Aires Restaurants, Cafes & Food review
YUMMY FOOD IN SAN TELMO
This is such a cool place to eat. what cought my eye was you can eat on the second floor with the view of the market area of san telmo. there are many… read entire review
19,035 km (11,828 miles) traveled
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