EFFFING HOT IN BUENOS AIRES

Buenos Aires Travel Blog

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THE EXPEDITON


EMPANADA TIME!!!!!!



OMG as soon as I walked thought the walk way, we can feel the heat. I already knew ahead of time that it was going to be hot. Countries below the equator, the seasons are different, from October to April it is spring and summer months. I brought my flip flops and few summer clothes.

 

Unfortunately, our flight was an hour early. We had to wait for our HURTIGRUTEN rep. we met some of the people on our flight going to ANTARCTICA as well. of course, my mum and I are the youngest ones on the tour and maybe on the cruise itself.  GOSH I SO WANT TO SLEEP!!!!!

 

We finally we got picked up. I am assuming the first group did not wait for us.
EMPANADA
I know that was a few others on the same tour. But anyhow, the rep took us to a mini city tour of BA. I was trying very hard not to pass out. it was about 11am and the city tour mum and I signed up for at 3:45pm. I wanted to take a nap before we go.

 

Our hotel was very nice, it was called the panamericano. It was near the obelisco. Our hotel was on ave. 9 de Julio or july 9th ave. which is the independence day for the Argentineans from Spain. It is the widest street in the world. We opt to not to see the tango show. I KNOW I KNOW, you can’t visit BA without seeing a tango show. Mum and I were not interested. We are more into the food. We plan to try to eat empanadas, pork sausage, blood sausage, and Argentina BBQ.

 

BA is such a European city. The architecture is very European.
CANDIES
BA is called the Paris of South America. Argentina just elected a new president last year, Christina. I will add more history about BA at the end of this entry.

 

It was 1pm, mum and I wanted to explore the city. We also wanted to grab a snack before the city tour. We walked about 2 blocks from the hotel. We turned on viamonte. I spotted an empanada restaurant. The front sign alone was called MORITA, EMPANADAS CASERAS, I assume it means, empanadas café. It also has pictures on empanadas with the sign. Well, it more like a fast food joint you found in a mall. They also serve pizza and such.

 

Thank god mum and I can read some Spanish. The guy at the counter does not speak English. Which I completely understand we were in their country, you can’t expect everybody to speak English where ever you travel.
THE FLAG
  Unfortunately I personally know, UGLY AMERICANS, which are Americans who expect everywhere they go speaks English and have luxuries of home. HELLOOOOOOO STAY HOME AND DON’T TRAVEL!!!!! Anyway, my mum was driving me crazy.  She was asking him questions. Um hello mum he can’t understand us. I would just order something familiar and just keep it simple. I saw jamon y queso. That is ham and cheese. I would just order that and I happy. Oh no not my mum, there is just common sense words like DOBLE and HORNO. Which is basically small or single size and DOBLE is double size. There was a guy that was listening to us and he was helping us, which was embarrassing to me. I was telling my mum what were veggies mean and she did not want to listen to me. I just said I AM SORRY, WE ARE DUMB AMERICANS. I did not want them to spit on our food.
The Parliament of Argentina
  They laughed and maybe they won’t spit on our food HAHAHHAA…….I HOPE.

 

I was people watching while we were waiting for our food. Argentineans are very European looking. Blond hair, blue eyes, and very good looking, some are very light skinned. I knew a few Argentineans both you would not know they are one had black hair, brown eyes, short about 5’6” and very cute. The other had light brown hair, green eyes, tall about 6’ and very handsome.

 

The server brought our empanadas, I ordered the horno carne criolla, which is the beef, potatoes, peppers mix and mum ordered the doble jamon, queso, palmintos y morr, which has ham, cheese, peppers, and onions.  MY FOOD REVIEW IS BELOW.

 

Afterwards, we bought a bottle of water since it was so hot in room.
The Obelisk.
We need cold iced bottle water.  we went to a 7-11 type convient store called 25hr HAHAHHAHA. Yeah I know they are truly open all day and beyond. I took photos of local candies and gum. Cookie pies that I have not seen before. We passed by a coffee shop and they served churros y chocolat which is my mum’s fave. I have some pesos left. It was 12 pesos for a mug of hot cocoa and a churro.  Which was very satisfying, it was a hot day but that top my day and made me forget……very briefly.

 

We will be back here again after exploring the Antarctica. I plan to take a radio taxi to ONCE, the Jewish quarter of BA. Mum and I walked back to the hotel. On the way there, I wanted to cross the av. 9 de Julio and take photos of obelisco. GEEEEZ , BA reminds me of Manila, you need to run for your life if you are a pedestrian.
PINK HOUSE
  HAHHAHAHAHA.  I took photos of the candies in BA. It is similar brands like I saw in Ecuador but some I have not seen.  We also purchased a bottle of water. I was such a hot day. I was wearing flip flops and a long shelve shirt and light pants.

 

It was such an international group of people in the bus. There people from Norway, France, UK, Canada, Australia,  Brazil, Ireland, and of course a few Americans from, FL, CA, NJ, and MI that we met so far. We had a well informed local our guide named, Diana. We drove all over the city. We drove on av. 9 de Julio we drove pasted the teatro colon.

 

Afterwards, we were so annoyed our hotel was still warm in the room. We have told the front desk 2 times that was still warm in the room.  It was so warm, I just passed out I was so tired from not sleeping in the plane.
9 DE JULIO AVE
We planned to eat at the Argentinean BBQ later that evening.  We also needed to have other baggage out by 2am. I was laying out my clothes for the next day. I did not want to take a shower before dinner. If I did, I would not want to leave the hotel.


We dropped off our stuff in room then met up with the others for the city tour. We went to see and we had some photo opps as well.  We saw the MAIN SIGHTS:


    * Avenida Alvear (along its westward route through the Recoleta area, its home to a concentration of boutiques, five-star hotels and belle époque palaces).
    * Corrientes Avenue (one of the city's principal thoroughfares. The avenue is intimately tied to the Tango and Porteño culture).
    * Avenida de Mayo (the avenue is often compared with those of Madrid, Barcelona and Paris due of its sophisticated buildings of art Nouveau, neoclassic and eclectic styles).
Teatro Colón (Colón Theatre).

    * Cabildo (a public building dating from the 1720s used as the government house during colonial times).
    * Caminito (restored in 1955 by Benito Quinquela Martín, its pastel-hued walls have become one of the city's icons).
    * Casa Rosada (the official seat of the executive branch of government in Argentina).
    * Cementerio de la Recoleta (the cemetery houses the crypts of some of the most important Argentine historical figures, including several presidents, scientists and the forbears of many of Argentina's most influential families). EX. Eva Peron
    * Florida Street (an elegant pedestrian street in downtown Buenos Aires).

    * Metropolitan Cathedral (the mother church of the Archdiocese of Buenos Aires).
    * National Congress (Argentine Parliament, completed in 1906).
    * National Library (the largest library in Argentina and one of the most important in the Americas).
    * Nueve de Julio Avenue (its name honors Argentina's Independence Day and is the widest avenue in the world).
    * The Obelisk (one of the icons of the city and a venue for various cultural activities and other events).
    * Palermo (A trendy neighborhood filled with restaurants, shops and clubs, it's also home to the Palermo Gardens and its over 200 acres).
    * Plaza de Mayo (arguably the nervecenter of Buenos Aires and witness to many demonstrations and pivotal events in Argentine history).
Casa Rosada (Pink House), Buenos Aires city centre. The President's offices are housed here.

    * Plaza San Martín (the heart of the distinguished Retiro area and former redoubt of Jorge Luis Borges).
    * Puerto Madero (developed over the 1880-era docklands, some of the city's tallest high-rise condominiums share the landscape with refurbished vintage wharf buildings).
    * San Telmo (one of the oldest neighborhoods of Buenos Aires. Well-preserved, it is characterized by its European and colonial architecture).
    * Teatro Colón (opened in 1908, it is one of the world's major opera houses).



We took a nap before dinner.  I uploaded some photos on TB and called my friends that I arrived. The restaurant La Chacra, is about 2 blocks walk. We were going to an Argentinean grill. I was looking forward to it. SEE REVIEW BELOW.



 
Afterwards, it was still day light we walked around the area. I checked out the night life on a Friday night.  I just walked around to buy a converter for my plugs. The plugs here are plugs that Australians use.   I found a camera shop and.  They had a bag full of different converters. I need to charge my camera battery.  I ended up passing out watching TV and It was terribly humid in the room. WAKE UP CALL IS AT 4AM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



WOOHOO ONE MORE DAY TO THE "WHITE CONTINENT"



I WILL BE GOING TO THE HURTIGRUTEN, SAME CRUISE WHEN I WENT TO NORWAY BACK IN 2007.
  I WOULD LIKE TO DO MY FUTURE TRIPS TO SVALBARD AND PLAY WITH THE POLAR BEARS ONE DAY :P

Day 1: Depart LA
Depart from the U.S. on your overnight flight to Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Day 2: Buenos Aires
Morning arrival at the Buenos Aires Airport in Argentina. During the transfer to your hotel, an orientation tour of the city will be given. You have the rest of the day to explore at leisure, or join one of the optional excursions.

Day 3: Buenos Aires-Ushuaia-Embarkation
After breakfast, transfer to the airport for your flight to Ushuaia, the world's southernmost city. You will enjoy an orientation tour of this popular and attractive resort town, surrounded by snow-capped mountains, rivers, and waterfalls, before boarding MS Fram.
In the evening an informative welcome meeting will be held. [B/D]

Days 4-5: The Drake Passage
Less than two days will be spent crossing the Drake Passage. During the crossing numerous lectures will be held on fascinating Antarctica, considered one of the most breathtaking and beautiful continents. You will arrive in Antarctica on Day 5. [B/L/D]

Days 5-9: Antarctica
Antarctica, "The White Continent," is more than half the size of North America. On the Antarctic Peninsula you'll experience the narrow, glacier-lined Lemaire Channel, considered one of most beautiful passages in Antarctica"where humpback and killer whales, various penguins, and elephant seals are a common sight"and the breathtaking Neumayer Channel, with its majestic cliffs. Visits by PolarCirkel boats will be attempted in various locations (weather permitting), including:

    * Whaler's Bay, on Deception Island, with its warm springs and black volcanic sand.

    * Half Moon Island, with spectacular views of the surrounding mountains, famous for its large chinstrap penguin rookery, kelp gulls and Antarctic terns. Whale spotting is also common here.
    * Yankee Harbor, home to a variety of seals and an estimated 4,000 gentoo penguin pairs. It is a common feeding area for whales as well.
    * Cuverville Island, boasting the largest known colony of gentoo penguins in the Antarctic Peninsula.
    * Neko Harbor, off spectacular Errera Channel, home to hundreds of gentoo penguins, Weddell and elephant seals, is believed to be part of mainland Antarctica.
    * Almirante Brown, in Paradise Harbor, named for its beauty, with ice cliffs and floating icebergs, home to gentoo and chinstrap penguins.

    * Petermann Island, home of the southernmost gentoo penguin colony, blue-eyed shags and Adélie penguins nest here too.
    * Port Lockroy, surrounded by mountains, glaciers and ice shelves, and known for its gentoo penguins and blue-eyed cormorants.
    * Wilhelmina Bay, feeding ground for whales and seals.
    * Antarctic Sound, where huge mile-long tabular icebergs can be seen. The sound is also home to an estimated half-million Adélie penguins as well as gentoo penguins, leopard seals and killer whales.
    * Brown Bluff, on the coast of the Antarctic Sound at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Adélie penguins, gentoo penguins, kelp gulls and Cape petrels can be found here and Weddell seals are regular visitors.



Days 9-10: The Drake Passage
While you cross this stretch of water from Antarctica, a series of lectures will be held onboard summing up topics related to Antarctica. [B/L/D]

Days 11: Disembarkation-Ushuaia-Buenos Aires
In the morning, you will reach the Argentinean city of Ushuaia. Ushuaia is reckoned to be the most southerly city in the world and is situated on Tierra del Fuego Island south of the Magellan Strait. After breakfast, you will be transferred to the airport for your flight to Buenos Aires. Upon arrival, transfer to the hotel. The rest of the day is at your disposal. [B]

Day 12: Buenos Aires : Return To The U.S.
Transfer to the airport for your return flight to the U.S. [B]

Day 13: Arrive in LA
Morning arrival in the U.S.




THE HISTORY OF BUENOS AIRES

 

Buenos Aires is the capital and largest city of Argentina.
The Metropolitan Cathedral.
It is located on the southern shore of the Río de la Plata, on the southeastern coast of the South American continent. Greater Buenos Aires is the third largest conurbation in Latin America, with a population of about 13 million. The city was originally named "Nuestra Señora del Buen Ayre" (Our Lady of the Fair Wind�"winds were very important in the age of sail) and later "Ciudad de La Santísima Trinidad y Puerto de Santa María del Buen Ayre" (City of the Most Holy Trinity and Port of St Mary of the Fair Winds).

 

After the internal conflicts of the 19th century, Buenos Aires was federalised and removed from Buenos Aires Province in 1880. The city limits were enlarged to include the former towns of Belgrano and Flores, which are both now neighbourhoods of the city.

 

People from the city proper are called porteños (people of the port).
Residents of the province are bonaerenses. People living in Greater Buenos Aires will often say they live in Buenos Aires, while those living in other towns in the province will name their town.

 

Modern History

 

During most of the 19th century, the political status of the city remained a sensitive subject. It was already capital of Buenos Aires Province, and between 1853 and 1860 it was the capital of the seceded State of Buenos Aires. The issue was debated more than once on the battlefield, until the matter was finally settled in 1880 when the city was federalised and became the seat of government, with its Mayor appointed by the President. The Casa Rosada became the seat of the office of the President.

 

In addition to the wealth generated by the fertile pampas, railroad construction in the second half of the 19th century increased the economic power of Buenos Aires as raw materials flowed into its factories; Buenos Aires became a multicultural city that ranked itself with the major European capitals.
La Recoleta Cemetery
The Colón Theater became one of the world's top opera venues. The city's main avenues were opened mostly between 1880 and 1940, an era that also saw the construction of South America's then-tallest buildings and first underground system.

 

Buenos Aires, by the 1920s, was a favoured destination for immigrants from Europe, as well as from Argentina's provinces and neighbouring countries. The impact of the economic crisis forced many farmers and other countryside workers to relocate to the outskirts of the larger cities, resulting in the creation of the first villas miserias (shanty towns), leading to extensive social problems which contrasted sharply with Argentina's image as a country of riches. Thus, the population of Buenos Aires jumped from 1.5 million inhabitants in 1914 to 3.5 million in 1935.
Deprived of political experience, in contrast with the European immigrants who brought with them socialist and anarchist ideas, these new city dwellers would provide the social base, in the next decade, for Peronism.

 

Buenos Aires was the cradle of Peronism: the now-mythologized demonstration of October 17, 1945 took place in Plaza de Mayo. Industrial workers of the Greater Buenos Aires industrial belt have been Peronism's main support base ever since, and Plaza de Mayo became the site for demonstrations and many of the country's political events. On June 16, 1955, a splinter faction of the Navy bombed the Plaza de Mayo area, killing 364 civilians (see Bombing of Plaza de Mayo). This was the only time the city was attacked from the air; this event was followed by a military uprising which deposed President Perón three months later (see Revolución Libertadora).
EVA PERON


 

In the 1970s, the city suffered from the fighting between left-wing revolutionary movements (Montoneros, E.R.P. and F.A.R.) and the right-wing paramilitary group Triple A, supported by Isabel Perón, who became president of Argentina in 1974 after Juan Perón's death.

 

The military coup of 1976, led by Jorge Rafael Videla, only escalated this conflict; the "Dirty War" resulted in 30,000 desaparecidos (people kidnapped and killed by the military during the years of the junta). The silent marches of their mothers (Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo) are a well-known image of Argentines suffering during those times.

 

The dictatorship also drew up plans for a network of freeways intended to relieve the city's acute traffic gridlock. The plan, however, called for building roads through residential areas and though only three of the seven planned were put up at the time, two of the three were obtrusive above ground freeways built with no sound walls or parallel landscaping through residential neighborhoods.
La Recoleta Cemetery
Efficiently built and undeniably practical, the structures' attendant problems, however, continue to inconvenience residents in a number of neighborhoods to this day.

 

The city was visited by Pope John Paul II twice: in 1982, due to the outbreak of the Falklands War (Spanish: Guerra de las Malvinas/Guerra del Atlántico Sur), and a second visit in 1987, which gathered crowds never before seen in the city.

 

On March 17, 1992 a bomb exploded in the Israeli Embassy, killing 29 and injuring 242. Another explosion on July 18, 1994 destroyed a building housing several Jewish organizations, killing 85 and injuring many more.

 

Following a 1993 agreement, the Argentine Constitution was amended to give Buenos Aires autonomy and rescinding, among other things, the president's right to appoint the city's mayor (as had been the case since 1880).
EVA PERON
On June 30, 1996, voters in Buenos Aires chose their first elected mayor (Chief of Government).

 

On December 30, 2004, a fire at the República Cromagnon nightclub killed 196 people, one of the greatest non-natural tragedies in Argentine history.

 

The Executive of the city is held by the Chief of Government ("Jefe de Gobierno"), who is directly elected for a four-year term, together with a Deputy Chief, who presides over the 60-member Legislature.

 

Each member of the Legislature is elected for a four year term; half of the Legislature is renewed every two years. Elections use the D'Hondt method. The Judicial branch is composed of the Supreme Court of Justice (Tribunal Superior de Justicia), the Magistrate's Council (Consejo de la Magistratura), the Public Ministry, and other City Courts.
EVA PERON DUARTE FAMILY TOMB


 

In legal terms, the city enjoys less autonomy than the provinces. The national Judiciary determine the autonomy of the city's Judiciary with regards to common law, while the national Executive branch controls the city's police.

 

Beginning in 2007, the city has embarked on a new decentralization scheme, creating new communes (comunas) managed by a seven-person elected committee..

 

Article 61 of the 1996 Constitution of the City of Buenos Aires states that "Suffrage is free, equal, secret, universal, compulsory and non-accumulative. Resident aliens enjoy this same right, with its corresponding obligations, on equal terms with Argentine citizens registered in the district, under the terms established by law."

 

Recent political history

 

In 1996, following the 1994 reform of the Argentine Constitution, the city held its first mayoral elections under the new statutes, with the mayor's title formally changed to "Chief of Government".
The winner was Fernando de la Rúa, who would later become President of Argentina for the period 1999 to 2001.


 

De la Rúa's successor, Aníbal Ibarra, won two popular elections, but was impeached (and ultimately deposed on March 6, 2006) as a result of the fire at the República Cromagnon nightclub. Jorge Telerman, who had been the acting mayor, was invested with the office. In the 2007 elections, Mauricio Macri won the second-round of voting over Daniel Filmus, and the office on December 9, 2007.

 

La Casa Rosada (Spanish for "the Pink House"), officially known as the Casa de Gobierno ("Government House") or Palacio Presidencial ("The Presidential Palace"), is the official seat of the executive branch of the government of Argentina. (When not working at the Casa Rosada, the president resides in a compound in Olivos, Buenos Aires.
LA BOCA
)

 

The Casa Rosada was built at the eastern end of the Plaza de Mayo in 1873, a large square which since the founding of the city of Buenos Aires has contained the top political institutions of Argentina. The building was constructed over the foundations of an earlier customs house, post office, and fortress. Its balcony, which faces the square, has served as a podium for many figures, including Eva Perón, who rallied the descamisados from there, and Pope John Paul II, who visited Buenos Aires in 1998. Madonna sang her filmed rendition of the song "Don't Cry for Me, Argentina," for the movie Evita, from the balcony after a meeting with the then President Carlos Menem.

 

The building is painted a light pink colour (and a darker pink colour on the side facing the plaza, after a recent repainting).
LA BOCA
It is currently undergoing extensive renovation, including repainting. Dubbed "Casa Rosada" by President Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, it is said that he chose this colour scheme in order to defuse political tensions by mixing the red and white colours of the country's opposing political parties. An alternative explanation suggests that the original paint contained cow's blood to prevent damage from the effects of humidity.

 

THE WIDEST STREET IN THE WORLD

 

Avenida 9 de Julio is an avenue in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Its name honors Argentina's Independence Day. (July 9, 1816).

 

The avenue runs roughly one kilometer to the west of the Río de la Plata waterfront, from the Retiro district in the north to Constitución station in the south.
LA BOCA
The avenue has six lanes in each direction.

 

The northern end of the avenue is connected to the Arturo Illia expressway (which connects to Jorge Newbery airport and the Pan-American highway) and to Libertador avenue. The southern end is connected to the 25 de Mayo tollway (serving the West side of Greater Buenos Aires as well as Ezeiza airport) and the 9 de Julio elevated expressway which provides access to the two main southbound roads out of the city (route 1 to La Plata and route 2 to Mar del Plata).

 

The main landmarks along the avenue are, north to south:

 

    * French Embassy: The French government refused to submit the embassy building for demolition, and local preservationists opposed the move as well, as the building is widely hailed as an architectural masterpiece.
LA BOCA
See this article (Spanish) for detail.

    * Teatro Colón

    * The western end of the Lavalle pedestrian street (the former strip of movie theaters)

    * The Obelisk and Plaza de la República

    * Statue of Don Quixote in the intersection with Avenida de Mayo

    * The former Ministry of Communications building (the only building sitting on the avenue itself), in the intersection with Moreno street.

    * Constitución station and Plaza Constitución

 

The avenue and obelisk on their 1937 inaugural.

 

The avenue's unusual width is due to the fact that it spans an entire city block, the distance between two streets in the checkerboard pattern used in Buenos Aires.
LA BOCA
The distance between adjacent streets is roughly 110 meters, greater than the equivalent distance in Manhattan, New York, USA. The street flanking 9 de Julio to the east is called Carlos Pellegrini (north of Rivadavia) and Bernardo de Irigoyen (south of Rivadavia). The street flanking 9 de Julio to the west is called Cerrito (north of Rivadavia) and Lima (south of Rivadavia).

 

The avenue was first planned in 1888 with the name of Ayohuma; but, long opposed by affected landlords and residents, work did not start until 1935. The initial phase was inaugurated on 9 July 1937 and the main stretch of the avenue was completed in the 1960s. The southern connections were completed after 1980, when the downtown portion of the tollway system was completed. Clearing the right-of-way for these intersections required massive condemnations in the Constitución area.
LA BOCA


 

Line C of the Buenos Aires Metro runs for a stretch under the avenue. Line A, Line B, Line D, and Line E have stations when their course intersects the avenue. Notably, lines B, C, and D share a station underneath the Obelisk, which is the focal point of the subway system and features a commercial gallery which also serves as an underpass. The respective station names are Carlos Pellegrini, Diagonal Norte, and 9 de Julio.

 

Crossing the avenue at street level often requires a few minutes, as all intersections have traffic lights. Under normal walking speed, it takes pedestrians normally two to three green lights to cross it. Some urban planners have submitted projects to move the central part of the avenue underground, to alleviate the perceived "chasm" between both sides of the avenue.
LA BOCA


 

Culture

 

Teatro Colón (Colón Theatre).

 

Strongly influenced by European culture, Buenos Aires is sometimes referred to as the "Paris of South America".

 

Buenos Aires is the site of the Teatro Colón, one of the world's greatest opera houses. It is closed for renovations until at least 2010. There are several symphony orchestras and choral societies. The city has numerous museums related to history, fine arts, modern arts, decorative arts, popular arts, sacred art, arts and crafts, theatre and popular music, as well as the preserved homes of noted art collectors, writers, composers and artists. There are plenty of sculptures from famous sculptors like Auguste Rodin and Antoine Bourdelle.
LA BOCA
It has many public libraries and cultural associations as well as the largest concentration of active theatres in Latin America[citation needed]. It has a world-famous zoo and Botanical Garden, a large number of landscaped parks and squares, as well as churches and places of worship of many denominations, many of which are architecturally noteworthy.

 

ONE OF THE BEST PLACE TO SHOP FOR LEATHER

 

Florida Street (in Spanish: Calle Florida) is an elegant street at Buenos Aires city centre, Argentina, some stretches of which have been pedestrianised since 1913.

Corner of pedestranized Florida Street and Santa Fe Avenue.

Florida St. and Cordoba Avenue.

Galerías Pacífico shopping arcade on Florida street corner Córdoba Ave.


Cathedral metro station on Florida St.

Florida Street, circa 1880.

 

The pedestrian section starts when Perú street crosses Avenida de Mayo, not far from Plaza de Mayo; after 50 meters, Perú street crosses Rivadavia and changes its name to Florida. The street then runs northwards for approximately one kilometer, up to Plaza San Martín in the Retiro area. It intersects Buenos Aires's other pedestrian street, Lavalle, the street of movie theaters.

 

Florida is one of the city's tourist attractions. It features a variety of shops and shopping arcades selling leather goods, jewellery, books and souvenirs. After the devaluation of 2001, the prices have become attractive to foreigners carrying hard currency, especially business travelers who stay at nearby hotels.


 

San Telmo and all other attractions of Buenos Aires city centre are a short walk away.

 

Language

 

Known as Rioplatense Spanish, Buenos Aires' Spanish (and also in other cities like Rosario and Montevideo, Uruguay) is characterised by voseo, yeísmo and aspiration of s in various contexts. It is heavily influenced by the dialects of Spanish spoken in Andalusia and Murcia. A phonetic study conducted by the Laboratory for Sensory Investigations of CONICET and the University of Toronto showed that the porteño accent is closer to the Neapolitan dialect of Italian than any other spoken language.

 

In the early 20th century, Argentina absorbed millions of immigrants, many of them Italians, who spoke mostly in their local languages (mainly Neapolitan, Sicilian and Genoan).
CHURROS Y CHOCOLAT
Their adoption of Spanish was gradual, creating a pidgin of Italian dialects and Spanish that was called cocoliche. Its usage declined around the 1950s.

 

Many Spanish immigrants were from Galicia, to the extent that Spaniards are still generically referred to in Argentina as gallegos (Galicians). Galician language, cuisine and culture had a major presence in the city for most of the 20th century. In recent years, descendants of Galician immigrants have led a mini-boom in Celtic music (which also highlighted the Welsh traditions of Patagonia).

 

Yiddish was commonly heard in Buenos Aires, especially in the Balvanera garment district and in Villa Crespo until the 1960s. Korean and Chinese have become significant since the 1970s. Most of the newer immigrants learn Spanish quickly and assimilate into city life.
ME :)


 

The Lunfardo argot originated within the prison population, and in time spread to all porteños. Lunfardo uses words from Italian dialects, from Brazilian Portuguese, from African and Caribbean languages and even from English. Lunfardo employs humorous tricks such as inverting the syllables within a word (vesre). Today, Lunfardo is mostly heard in tango lyrics [34]; the slang of the younger generations has been evolving away from it. See also: Belgranodeutsch.

 

Tango

 

Tango music was born in the suburbs of Buenos Aires, notably in the brothels of the Junín y Lavalle district and in the arrabales (poorer suburbs). Its sensual dance moves were not seen as respectable until adopted by the Parisian high society in the 1920s, and then all over the world.
In Buenos Aires, tango-dancing schools (known as academias) were usually men-only establishments.

 

Tango consists of a variety of styles that developed in different regions and eras of Argentina and Uruguay as well as in other locations around the world. The dance developed in response to many cultural elements, such as the crowding of the venue and even the fashions in clothing. The styles are mostly danced in either open embrace, where lead and follow connect at arms length, or close embrace, where the lead and follow connect chest-to-chest.

 

Early tango was known as tango criollo, or simply tango. Today, there are many tango dance styles, including Argentine Tango, Uruguayan Tango, Ballroom tango (American and International styles), Finnish tango and vintage tangos.

Actresses Chunchuna Villafañe and Norma Aleandro share a painful memory in the Oscar-winning The Official Story (1985).
CHOCOLATE HEAVEN


 

Cinema

 

The cinema first appeared in Buenos Aires in 1896. The city has been the centre of the Argentine cinema industry in Argentina for over 100 years since French camera operator Eugene Py directed the pioneering film La Bandera Argentina in 1897. Since then, over 2000 films have been directed and produced within the city, many of them referring to the city in their titles, such as Buenos Aires Plateada, and Buenos Aires a la vista. The culture of tango music has been incorporated into many films produced in the city, especially since the 1930s. Many films have starred tango performers such as Hugo del Carril, Tita Merello, Carlos Gardel and Edmundo Rivero.

 

Architecture

 

Galerías Pacífico on Florida Street.
ARGENTINA BBQ


Modern architecture at Buenos Aires city centre.

Art-deco and neoclassical styles converge on Diagonal Norte.

 

Buenos Aires architecture is characterized by its individuality and uniqueness, with elements resembling Barcelona, Paris and Madrid.

 

Italian and French influences increased after the declaration of independence at the beginning of the 19th century, though the academic style persisted until the first decades of the 20th century.

 

Attempts at renovation took place during the second half of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, when European influences penetrated into the country, reflected by several buildings of Buenos Aires such as the Iglesia Santa Felicitas by Ernesto Bunge; the Palace of Justice, the National Congress, and the Teatro Colón, all of them by Vittorio Meano.
PORK SAUSAGE AND BLOOD SAUSAGE


 

The simplicity of the Rioplatense baroque style can be clearly seen in Buenos Aires through the works of Italian architects such as André Blanqui and Antonio Masella, in the churches of San Ignacio, Nuestra Señora del Pilar, the Cathedral and the Cabildo.

 

The architecture of the second half of the 20th century continued to reproduce French neoclassic models, such as the headquarters of the Banco de la Nacion Argentina built by Alejandro Bustillo, and the Museo Hispanoamericano de Buenos Aires. However, since the 1930s the influence of Le Corbusier and European rationalism consolidated in a group of young architects from the University of Tucumán, among whom Amancio Williams stands out. The construction of skyscrapers proliferated in Buenos Aires until the 1950s. Newer modern high-technology buildings by Argentine architects in the last years of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st include the Le Parc Tower by Mario Álvarez, the Torre Fortabat by Sánchez Elía and the Repsol-YPF Tower by César Pelli.
NORTON 2007 MALBEC


 

La Boca is a neighborhood, or barrio of the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires. It retains a strong European flavour, with many of its early settlers being from the Italian city of Genoa. In fact the name has a strong assonance with the genoese neighborhood of Boccadasse (or Bocadaze in genoese dialect), and some people believe that the Buenos Aires' barrio was indeed named after it. The conventional explanation is that the neighborhood sits at the mouth ("boca" in Spanish) of the Riachuelo.

 

In 1882, after a lengthy general strike, La Boca seceded from Argentina, and the rebels raised the Genoese flag, which was immediately torn down personally by then President Julio Argentino Roca.

 

It is known throughout the sporting world as the home of Boca Juniors, one of world's top football clubs.
SHOCKING I KNOW!!!!
La Boca is a popular destination for tourists visiting Argentina, with its colourful houses and pedestrian street, the Caminito, where tango artists perform and tango-related memorabilia is sold. Other attractions include the La Ribera theatre, many tango clubs and Italian taverns, as well as La Bombonera, home of Boca Juniors.

 

It has also been a centre for radical politics, having elected the first socialist member of Argentine Congress (Alfredo Palacios in 1935) and been home to many demonstrations during the crisis of 2001.

 

As one of Buenos Aires's 48 barrios, La Boca is located in the city's south-east near its old port. The barrio of Barracas is to the west; San Telmo and Puerto Madero are to the north.

mellemel8 says:
hahaha i am glad :)
Posted on: Jun 05, 2009
VinaR says:
awesome write up! i learned so much!
Posted on: Jun 05, 2009
wanderingluster says:
i'm certainly looking forward to getting to BA, thanks for the tips and history lesson!!
Posted on: Dec 20, 2008
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THE EXPEDITON
THE EXPEDITON
EMPANADA
EMPANADA
CANDIES
CANDIES
THE FLAG
THE FLAG
The Parliament of Argentina
The Parliament of Argentina
The Obelisk.
The Obelisk.
PINK HOUSE
PINK HOUSE
9 DE JULIO AVE
9 DE JULIO AVE
Teatro Colón (Colón Theatre).
Teatro Colón (Colón Theatre).
Casa Rosada (Pink House), Buenos A…
Casa Rosada (Pink House), Buenos …
The Metropolitan Cathedral.
The Metropolitan Cathedral.
La Recoleta Cemetery
La Recoleta Cemetery
EVA PERON
EVA PERON
La Recoleta Cemetery
La Recoleta Cemetery
EVA PERON
EVA PERON
EVA PERON DUARTE FAMILY TOMB
EVA PERON DUARTE FAMILY TOMB
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
LA BOCA
CHURROS Y CHOCOLAT
CHURROS Y CHOCOLAT
ME :)
ME :)
CHOCOLATE HEAVEN
CHOCOLATE HEAVEN
ARGENTINA BBQ
ARGENTINA BBQ
PORK SAUSAGE AND BLOOD SAUSAGE
PORK SAUSAGE AND BLOOD SAUSAGE
NORTON 2007 MALBEC
NORTON 2007 MALBEC
SHOCKING I KNOW!!!!
SHOCKING I KNOW!!!!
HAHAHAHAH
HAHAHAHAH
OUR ROOM
OUR ROOM
OUR ROOM
OUR ROOM
OUR ROOM
OUR ROOM
OUR ROOM
OUR ROOM
YERBA MATE CUPS
YERBA MATE CUPS
FLIP FLOPS!!!
FLIP FLOPS!!!
YUMMY
YUMMY
EMPANADAS
EMPANADAS
PHARMACY
PHARMACY
MAGAZINES
MAGAZINES
MAGAZINES
MAGAZINES
CANDY
CANDY
FRUIT BARS
FRUIT BARS
OOOOOOO
OOOOOOO
CHIPS
CHIPS
HOTEL
HOTEL
HOTEL
HOTEL
PINK HOUSE
PINK HOUSE
PINK HOUSE
PINK HOUSE
Buenos Aires Restaurants, Cafes & Food review
ARGENTINA GRILL
This was recommended to us by the hurtigurten rep in the hotel. it was only 2 blocks away from the panamericano hotel. argentina is known for the stea… read entire review
Buenos Aires Restaurants, Cafes & Food review
MEAT PIES ON THE GO
We just arrived in BA. after getting settled in our hotel. we washed up and explored downtown. my mum and i new argentina is known of their empanadas.… read entire review