God, No More Ciggies!!!!

Pundaquit Travel Blog

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River and Pine trees

Waking up quite early, with my back slightly aching from sleeping in the tent with only thin blanket giving me not enough comfort from my sleep last night. I had no qualms about it actually, it was expected and part of the whole adventure. However adding more to the backache was the headache and feeling of dehydration from last night binge drinking, it could worsen if I stayed sleeping (so I thought). We ran out of cigarette from the previous night's socials and there's no other option to shake that reality off but by taking a walk in the woods. I saw Will (another camper I made friend from the last night's drinking) getting ready for the walk. I knew about his plan from last night but I was not really taking it seriously.

Will, me and another camper, Tetet who was on a high note as always as if she has an unlimited supply of ganja went to the trek. Initially, we planned to reach some peak but after walking through a bizarre landscape of dry riverbed, twigs and bushes and somehow out-of-place pine trees for few minutes, Will being the "leader" asked if we wanted to reach a peak or just see the "golf course" like area with vast vacant space with few interesting pines trees and Mt Anawangin as the backdrop.

Mt Anawangin (I think)
We opted to go to the easier trail. Upon reaching the golf course, we stayed there for few minutes and went back to the camp. On our way, we passed by some river with pine trees on the riverbanks. For unaccoustomed eyes, it was a  special sight.

Anawangin got its name from Ilocano word nuang which means carabao. There were stories of wild carabao attacking humans. Good thing, it never happened to us.

Upon reaching the camp, we had our breakast, then followed with another walk on the beach. The sand in Anawangin Cove is actually from Mt. Pinatubo. The sand is not white and powdery, it is mostly gray, ash from the volcano. According to the locals, the pine trees, (actually Agoho trees) did not exist in the area before the eruption of Mt.

The Cove of Anawangin
Pinatubo in 1991. It looks like the ash fall somehow brought with it Agoho seedsand they grew into the forest we see at Anawangin today. Mt Pinatubo and Anawangin Cove are both in the same province of Zambales.

There was an easy climb to a small summit near the beach, the 5 minutes ascend has given me a good look of the cove. Anawangin Cove is a crescent shaped cove with a pristine volcanic white sand beach. There is no direct road to Anawangin from the towns. The cove's isolation has kept it free from development, there are no resorts on this natural beauty, save for a few huts, deep wells and not-so polished toilets.

After the hike, it was time for lunch and our eventual departure back to Pundaquit.

The other side
We originally planned to drop by Capones Island (which I always mispronounced as Camotes) but since it was already late and the waves were stronger, we drop the island from our itinerary. The trip back to Pundaquit was more exciting, bigger waves and the sun was so up that it burned my face.

We reached Pundaquit so wet. I changed clothes, bought a pack of cigarette. We settled back to the van as I indulged myself with my nicotine addiction.

Few more hours, we were back to Manila, back to the jungle where we are very familiar of.

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River and Pine trees
River and Pine trees
Mt Anawangin (I think)
Mt Anawangin (I think)
The Cove of Anawangin
The Cove of Anawangin
The other side
The other side
So mushroom
So mushroom
Pundaquit
photo by: planisphere