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Luxor: Temple'd Out

Luxor Travel Blog

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Haptshepsut Temple

In Luxor right now. Just visited 4 temples in 6 hours - The Valley of the Kings, Haptshepsut Temple, Temple of Karnak and Luxor Temple. I'm all temple'd out! Will be catching an overnight train back to Cairo tonight. Dreading the thought of it - all 10 hours of it.

The day began with breakfast and when our riverboat docked, we all got on the bus. We had 2 security guards on our bus to help assure our safety. I feel rather unsafe with them around. Afterall, they were carrying firearms!

We first visited the world-famous Valley of the Kings. Valley of the Kings is just that - a valley where the pharoahs were buried. Hahaha... Okay. Not. Commoners were also buried in the area, as well as other royal families and very close friends of the royal family.

Haptshepsut Temple

King Tut was buried here. So was Ramses I, II, III, IV and oh, his 20+ kids? One of the tombs we entered was filled with traps a 'la Indiana Jones with its small narrow staircase that leads you to the lower chamber which becomes into a slide... down into a bottomless pit - or atleast it is but it was too dark for me to determine if it was indeed bottomless, to the narrow walkways over yet another - I'm sure -bottomless pit and a chamber intentionally designed to make everyone believe to be the resting place of the king - but no... just behind and below that chamber, lies another narrow and low doorway that leads to another chamber, a room where the would be mummy of the pharoah lrests. The air was stifling and as soon as we reached the room, I was glad to leave.

Haptshepsut Temple: view of the Nile River Valley
There were no mummy in that room - just one of his sarcophagus. I forgot if that pharoah's mummy was one of the royal mummies we saw in Cairo Museum or not. Hmm... 

Some of the tombs requires additional fee while the 3 of the available tombs were included with the entrance fee. King Tut was one of the tombs that required additional fee. My sister and I opted out of that since after seeing quite a lot of mummies in the Cairo Museum, we didn't want to see another one - even if it was King Tut's. After all, one mummy really just looks like the next one. And, we honestly couldn't differentiate between them, anyhow.

However, according to the accounts of my friends who bought the ticket for King Tut's tomb, his mummy was a small one (not surprising there since he died - or was it murdered?- at around 10 years old) and it was a small room.

Colosus of Memnon
That definitely did not surprise me! King Tut and his tomb only became famous for ONE reason only. And THAT IS - his tomb - which was found by mistake by Egyptologist studying the Valley of the Kings, was THE ONLY ONE FOUND COMPLETELY INTACT and UNRAVAGED by graverobbers - both thousand of years ago to the present. A video in the visitors' center entrance presented the archeological dig that accounted for the massive collections that filled King Tut's tomb. A young king of only a few years with such treasures (found on several rooms) in his tomb only shows that the older kings that preceded him must have MORE treasures in their tombs!

My sister and I chose another king's tomb, whose name I can't recalled at the moment - so expect an edit on this entry, for its artwaork.

Karnak Temple
Kings' tombs are adorned with Egyptian hieroglyphs. Colors were also used to design these tombs. This king's tomb had one of the best preserved artwork and colors in the Valley of the Kings. It also recently just finished being 'cleaned' - so the colors are bright and glowing. Hehe... okay so not glowing, but it sure did not looked like it was more than two thousand years old, that's for sure. At the end of this tomb also contains an unusual design not seen in other tombs. The room where the king's sarcophagus is located has well-preserved colors and its ceiling is semi-dome shape, compared to just a box-like, flat ceiling of other tombs. The original outer sarcophagus is also inside this king's tomb - unfortunately, broken due to, I believe, some thing fell on it during excavation or so.
Karnak Temple
Photos were not allowed to be taken in any of the tombs so I have no photographic evidence to prove and illustrate the colors, hierlogyphics and sarcophagus that covered from floor to ceilings of this tomb.

After the Valley of the Kings, we continued on to Haptshepsut Temple located on the other side of the Valley of the King. This temple was designed by the queen's lover. Haptshepsut is one of the most powerful female pharoahs in Egypt. Egypt flourished in her reign. The temple was designed - I believe - by her lover. And the temple is connected to the Valley of the King by a tunnel through the mountain.

Haptshepsut Temple has a fantastic view of Luxor's Nile River Valley. From afar, you can see the green-ness of the valley, fed by the River Nile. It is deifnitely greener than Aswan!

Isabetlog says:
Nice blog! I envy you! I went to Egypt when I was only 10 and can't remember anything for shit, except for the mad driver we had who nearly gave my lola a heart attack. That and riding a camel :D
Posted on: Jul 30, 2008
andiboi says:
love Egypt... in the near future though, it's in reach hehe, just need to save up though... i'll have questions for you then when I'm ready to go hehe :-)
...informative blog, cool :-)
Posted on: Jul 30, 2008
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Haptshepsut Temple
Haptshepsut Temple
Haptshepsut Temple
Haptshepsut Temple
Haptshepsut Temple: view of the Ni…
Haptshepsut Temple: view of the N…
Colosus of Memnon
Colosus of Memnon
Karnak Temple
Karnak Temple
Karnak Temple
Karnak Temple
Karnak Temple
Karnak Temple
Karnak Temple
Karnak Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor Temple
Luxor
photo by: LadyMaja