mud baths, tombs and turtle beach

Dalyan Travel Blog

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Mud baths (back) and sulphur pool.

Now our skin felt clean and fresh from the previous day there was only one thing for it, a trip to the mud baths!

 

Tourists are told that using the mud baths will take 10 years off their looks (sounds good!) and locals use it (on a regular basis) to cure numerous diseases such as rheumatism and eczema. The baths can be reached by a short boat ride along the river.  

First stop is a dip in a mud pool during which you pick up the thick mud from the bottom and literally cake yourself in it. It ‘s great fun watching people covering themselves with mud and then you catch sight of yourself in the full length mirror they have positioned as you climb out! After you have finished in the mud bath you stand in the sun to bake hard. The place is full of living statues.

Fresh water lake
Once the mud has hardened (about 15-20 minutes) you shower yourself (believe me the mud gets everywhere!) We then carefully walked to the sulphur pool. The walk down was really slippery - so beware! The natural clear sulphur pool has a temperature of 40 degrees Celsius and I found it didn’t smell quite as bad as I expected! Then it’s time for another shower.

 

I’m not sure about the claims but the mud baths are a great laugh! Make sure you take your camera (although if you are on an organised trip, they might have a photographer). 

 

Our boat trip then took us for a swim in the fresh water lakes which was a great way to cool off. The lakes are surrounded by mountains and form a stunning backdrop for a swim.

The Lycian 'temple type' rock tombs. These were carved top to bottom (note the largest has not been completed).
Luckily we didn’t see any snakes :0)

 

Further down the river are Dalyan’s Lycian type rock tombs which were built in 4 BC and were also used during the Roman period later. Only the wealthy would have been placed inside these temples, which had to be paid for before they died. It is believed the tombs were used not only to prevent the fertile land being used but also to raise the dead to be nearer to their god. You can climb up to some of the tombs (not the most impressive ones though) however most tour operators advise against it due to preservation issues.

 

Next a barbeque lunch on board the boat and a swim in another lake.

 

A visit to Turtle beach (Iztuzu Beach) followed. This is a beautiful 6km strand of golden brown sand. The beach is famous as a breeding ground for the loggerhead turtle. Turtle beach hit the headlines in 1987 when the foundations for a luxury hotel were laid at the south end of the beach. There was a storm of protest from conservationists throughout the world (including David Bellamy), backed by public opinion the Turkish government scrapped the project and declared the beach a protected area. The beach is open from 8am to 8pm so there’s no disturbance for the turtles. You are forbidden to push parasols in the sand in case there are nests of eggs beneath. Known nests are protected with wire cages. The sand is soft, the sea is warm and the pancakes delicious!

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Mud baths (back) and sulphur pool.
Mud baths (back) and sulphur pool.
Fresh water lake
Fresh water lake
The Lycian temple type rock tomb…
The Lycian 'temple type' rock tom…
Iztuzu Beach
Iztuzu Beach
A protected turtle nest.
A protected turtle nest.
Dalyan
photo by: ZoeCaitlin