The art of doing nothing.

Adiyaman Travel Blog

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Charlene slept here. Under protest.
I woke up on my extra-firm twin bed and looked around our baby blue and purple room. It hadn’t improved overnight. I was determined to leave quickly.

Steve was feeling better and we had a simple but tasty breakfast out on the terrace. It was shady, breezy and pleasant. We then learned that Urfa, our next destination, is really hot these days -- over 40 degrees. Hmmm, I guess there’s no need to hurry to Urfa. Maybe we’ll stay just a while here in the shade…

I was then surprised and delighted to find a wireless connection on the terrace that hadn’t shown up in the room. Fast Internet in the middle of nowhere up here on Mt Nemrut -- I just love technology!

So I was feeling pretty content on the beautiful terrace, with fast Internet, a ready supply of tea, and cows grazing peacefully in the distance.
Almost doing nothing.
It was all too perfect (if I didn’t think about the room). So I said to Steve, Well….maaaaaybe we could stay another night after all? He said, “Weeeeeell, the room’s not awful. At least it’s clean…”

So we decided to stay. Steve was still not 100% feeling well and went back to bed, where he slept until 2pm. I tried to do the whole relaxation thing, but could only pull it off for about 15 minutes. I then went to work making a day-by-day itinerary and booking hotels for our upcoming 10-day drive along the Aegean coast with our friend Lisa, who is coming from Minneapolis on the 18th. I was quite successful, getting all but one of the hotels I wanted. Very productive day!

The German vacationers were also out on the terrace.
View from the terrace.
They had thoroughly perfected the art of doing nothing. They got up late, and lounged with books and cool drinks. They moved their chairs to follow the shade. They took frequent dips in the pool. They drank tea. They conversed. I watched with curiosity because is very much the opposite end of the spectrum from our travels. We aren’t really on a “vacation” like that. We are here to see and do interesting things in many countries, and that means getting out there in the world, every day. It is always interesting and usually exhilarating, but it can be tiring, too. Maybe we could have a few “do nothing” days every so often. These Germans can be our role models. We’ll see about that.

In the evening, we drove up the mountain again. Steve had missed the view and the Big Heads at the summit, so we decided to go back for a second showing. It was just as nice the second time.

Dinner at the hotel was at 9pm. We hadn’t been served lunch and were completely starving by this time, and gobbled down the bread basket. The food was delicious. Spicy vegetable soup, sautéed vegetables for me and meat and vegetables for Steve, served with a tasty grain of some sort. Very good. It wasn’t such a bad call, staying here another day. But now it’s time to face what I’ve avoided all day: our room. That twin bed! The Donald Duck fixture! Good god.

Good night.   
 
lrecht says:
Do Nothing days are fantastic, even if they involve staring at a Donald Duck light....I will have to find a picture from our Puno, Peru blog of this goofy elephant lamp....Have fun!
Posted on: Jul 08, 2008
portia says:
yeah, makes sense when you are on long travels, you need to take "vacations" from your travel too! I have not done any long trips myself. but free wireless is definitely a plus!
Posted on: Jul 07, 2008
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Charlene slept here. Under protest.
Charlene slept here. Under protest.
Almost doing nothing.
Almost doing nothing.
View from the terrace.
View from the terrace.
The hike up Mt. Nemrut.
The hike up Mt. Nemrut.
On my way up the mountain.
On my way up the mountain.
Big clouds at Mt. Nemrut.
Big clouds at Mt. Nemrut.
The Big Heads at Mt. Nemrut.
The Big Heads at Mt. Nemrut.
Mt. Nemrut.
Mt. Nemrut.
Mountain vegetation.
Mountain vegetation.
Steve can find a bench anywhere.
Steve can find a bench anywhere.
The hike up Mt. Nemrut.
The hike up Mt. Nemrut.
Adiyaman
photo by: Memo