Iditarod & arriving in Anchorage

Anchorage Travel Blog

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Iditarod sled dogs ready to pull our cart

 

We loved visiting the puppies at the Iditarod Headquarters!  They encouraged us to hold them and since we beat the tour buses initially, we each got a puppy to love.  Then we all piled on the 4-wheel big cart and dogs who have run in the Iditarod pulled us around an almost mile track.  That was great fun and the dogs were very fast, with the wind whipping our cheeks.  There was a man standing on the back of the cart yelling “gee” (right) and “haw” (left) – it was just a terrific experience!

 

The Iditarod movie and museum portion inside were also wonderful.  Of course now I want to come back in March to see the race.

Iditarod sled dog ride
  I’d love to spend a year in Alaska to experience the winter. People who live here cherish their peace in the winter, the northern lights, and the fun they have with snow activities.  It must be a neat place to live.

 

I read that the energy required to live had people talking to communicate, not to socialize, which explains how few words are used by locals, although they’re very nice.

 

After making pancakes in the rig, and going back for more puppy-time and t-shirts, we headed on down the road.  A stop at Fred Meyers and for gas provided needed supplies (but feels like a big time-sink).  The road got wide with multiple lanes at high speed and we missed the quiet nature of Alaska as we headed to the big city.

 

Finally we pulled into Anchorage and settled in the municipal campground of Centennial Park.  It is 4.5 miles from downtown Anchorage but beautifully treed and the office people are nice.

 

We met our caravan friends, Ken and Sherry, at the very nearby Native Historical Museum.  The good news was that we've learned most of that information along our travels, particularly at the museums we've attended.  We did enjoy the native dances that students did- a translation of the ancient language would have helped us understand the music.  It was nice, but the entrance fee was very high for what is essentially a village museum.  For cruise people who need a few hours of information, it is a good activity.  We enjoyed talking to the students who were guides in each village and they were impressive in their knowlege and delivery.

 

Then we returned to our peaceful campground- so we thought.  We were surprised last night when a chainsaw revved up 2 sites over at 9:30 pm.  Charles came flying out of bed with his eyes wide with shock.  I explained that this was Alaska and the guy needed more wood for his fire.  So he was merely using his chainsaw to cut off hunks of the large trees, which I guess he hauled in with him.  At 9:30 am, we got another presentation, along with real live log splitting.  The kids were surprised to hear that there are log-splitting contests here in Alaska… for women.  I think self-sufficiency is terrific!

 

So we never really got into Alaska’s largest city, where most of the population reside, but we’re poised for entry tomorrow.  Cities, for me, are a necessary evil- something that I don't want the kids to miss, but I sure would take a quiet, country town over a city any day.

 

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Iditarod sled dogs ready to pull o…
Iditarod sled dogs ready to pull …
Iditarod sled dog ride
Iditarod sled dog ride
Iditarod headquarters in Wasilla, …
Iditarod headquarters in Wasilla,…
Iditarod headquarters
Iditarod headquarters
Iditarod headquarters
Iditarod headquarters
Iditarod headquarters
Iditarod headquarters
Iditarod headquarters gift shop
Iditarod headquarters gift shop
Iditarod headquarters
Iditarod headquarters
Anchorages Native Heritage Center
Anchorage's Native Heritage Center
Anchorages Native Heritage Center
Anchorage's Native Heritage Center
Coming into Anchorage from Wasilla
Coming into Anchorage from Wasilla
Anchorage
photo by: anupa_rk