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John Cabot University

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Trastevere

The first weekday since arriving in Rome. As soon as we woke up we walked through the Vatican to John Cabot University to visit my future school. We got there just as classes were beginning, we asked the secretary about a tour of the school and she sent someone down from the offices.

A woman from admissions office came to greet us, she gave me a bag with all the information I could need inside. She showed us around the school, it didn’t take long since the school is very small. The classes looked dark but standard, the courtyards were beautiful. The plants were flowering in the spring weather and students were lounging around talking or playing ping-pong.

the street my school is on
There was a large classroom for the biggest classes that looked recently renovated, that was right next to the housing department where we scheduled a visit to the dorms.

After seeing the school she led us to the admissions office where I asked the staff a few questions. Then my mother and I decided to walk around Trastevere, the neighborhood where the school is located.

It looks like the center of an old town, with small pedestrian streets and a center plaza at the front of an old church.

Once we found Viale Trastevere, the main street, we looked for an alarm clock. We would have to wake up early on Thursday to catch our flight so an alarm clock was necessary, of course we had forgotten to take one. We stopped into a supermarket not knowing where to look.

Trastevere
With our limited Italian skills we asked “Dov’é” and made ridiculous hand gestures as if waking up and stopping the clock. It took a couple tries but after making total fools of ourselves the lady understood. Unfortunately she said they didn’t have them and had no idea where they would be. There was a bank next to the store with a large advertisement and a picture of an alarm clock! We stopped pedestrians and asked “Dov’é comprare?” and then pointing to the clock. Most people thought we wanted to buy a bank or didn’t understand at all. Eventually we gave up and walked a few feet away. And there, there of all places! A street vendor was selling belts, and alarm clocks.

We spent the rest of the day walking around the surroundings. We walked all the way to the ancient walls of the city were portions are still standing.

next to the gardens of Garibaldi
We walked around the edge  and into a nice park. It was full of fountains, flowers, and ruins. It was so strange to see ruins in the middle of parks, in the middle of streets or anywhere.

We walked along a few residential streets with enormous houses and to the Fonte Acqua Paola. It was beautiful and perfectly blue and white, it also gave a great view of Rome from the hill. Since it is not in the center of the city and it is surrounded by a busy street there was barely anyone there.

We proceeded to walk up through the Garibaldi Park, a walkway that went up a hill to the monument to Garibaldi and the Faro. Both locations also had similar views of the skyline; the center was perfectly visible with numerous cupolas.
Fonte Acqua Paola
On the way down we were starved from so much walking, we found a nice restaurant not far from JCU and we ate a great meal. I’ll say that this place was my favorite restaurant of all the places we ate. Generally we would stop in touristy areas in the center or at a cheap place, but this was simply divine. The meal came with champagne and wine, I had the Roman specials one pasta dish and one lamb dish.

After the lunch we walked down the Tiber to the Isola Tiberina. A small church is on the island as well as an emergency hospital. We saw many people lying near the water and resting, so we climbed down some steps as well. The Roman sun was hitting strong at this time of day and we sat for a while watching the seagulls and the water.

The synagogue was next on our list which was just across the river.
Fonte Acqua Paola
We wanted to enter but there was a fee and it was about to close, so we decided to move on to the Roman ruins of temples and the theatre. There was a church that had been built on top of the Roman temple of Juno. From the outside you could see Roman columns and square medieval additions alternating to form the church. The inside was all stolen stones, each column was a different color. Some stones had Roman inscriptions but had still been used to make the new structure. There was a free short tour that we could do of the foundations. Our guide seemed in a hurry to get over with the tour so he took us down the stairs and showed us the rooms very quickly. There was not much to see other than a couple square stones that marked where each Roman temple began and ended.

Our map showed a Roman theatre to be next to the church so we headed in the direction we thought was right. It turned out we just ended up climbing a hill, it sort of helped though. From there we saw the theatre and descended the hill, strewn with old stones that had once been part of some great temple. The sun was setting just as we got to the theatre. We began walking to it but were told that it had just closed.

We hadn't noticed that we were right next to the Piazza Venezia, so we walked to the monument to Vitorio Emmanuelle and saw the Roman Forum from above.
rambro says:
Hi, Great pictures. My son is interesting in attending JCU. He will be a junior in Sept 09. Any words of wisdom for him. He wants to attend for 4 yrs and earn is bachelors degree in Business.
Thx
Posted on: Aug 09, 2008
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Trastevere
Trastevere
the street my school is on
the street my school is on
Trastevere
Trastevere
next to the gardens of Garibaldi
next to the gardens of Garibaldi
Fonte Acqua Paola
Fonte Acqua Paola
Fonte Acqua Paola
Fonte Acqua Paola
View of Rome from the Faro
View of Rome from the Faro
Old city wall
Old city wall
Dandolo
Dandolo
me in the gardens
me in the gardens
monument to Garibaldi
monument to Garibaldi
Faro
Faro
Monument to Victor Emmanuelle II
Monument to Victor Emmanuelle II
Piazza Venezia: crossing this stre…
Piazza Venezia: crossing this str…
Hadrian
Hadrian
Hadrian
Hadrian
Forum Romanum
Forum Romanum
monument to Victor Emmanuele II
monument to Victor Emmanuele II
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photo by: vulindlela