Baclayon, Bohol

Bohol Travel Blog

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Our lunch - longganisa (sausage) & native chicken
I've been wanting to see Bohol for as long as I can remember. Even before I was born, our house had always been run by Boholanos and continues to be up to this day. Everytime they'd come home from a short vacation, they would bring back stories about their excursions to the Chocolate Hills and the native Tarsiers, about how serene and stunning it is in their part of the country, and how I should visit the place they're from, seeing that I do quite a bit of traveling. So when an invite from Nena, a sort of long lost friend, popped up on my screen, I eagerly considered the possibility.

We arrived in Tagbilaran on a rainy afternoon. The B&B we were staying at offered airport transfers, so we were lucky in that we didn't have to complete with others trying to get a cab in the pouring rain.
Baclayon Church
We made our way directly to the adjoining town of Baclayon where we would be spending our weekend. The rain of course worried us, and it didn't relieve us much to be told by the driver that it had been raining the past few days. Hopefully Mother Nature would've cried buckets after this downpour so we could fully enjoy our vacation.

As luck would have it, the rain did let up by the time we arrived at the Bohol Narra Homestay. We were greeted by Emie, the housekeeper cum tour guide. Never without a smile on her face, she offered to take us around for the afternoon. Given that we hadn't had lunch, we made a stop at the market beside the historic Baclayon Church where we found a nice little carinderia (eatery) owned by a friend of hers.
Baclayon Church
It was a quick meal for these two hungry cats and we made our way to the church soon after.

One of the oldest in the Philippines, the Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception in Baclayon is one of the best preserved churches in the region. The second oldest stone church in the country (with San Agustin in Intramuros, Manila being the first built in 1571), it is also made up of  hard wood of the kamagong, molave and narra variety, making it difficult for termites to eat through. The name baclay is derived from the Visayan term for walk, as the church is situated just across the coast. Steeped in history, the church dates back to the time of the Spanish occupation. The church was originally built by the Jesuits in 1596, where they settled until they were forced to move to the neighboring town of Loboc fearing possible Moro invasions.
Baluarte shed
In 1717 the Baclayon Church became a parish and the construction of a new one was begun. Construction of this new church required transporting corals from the sea, cutting them into blocks, employing bamboo to position them and using the whites from a million eggs to glue them all together. It took about two hundred laborers to do the work and the church was finally completed in 1727. The fruits of their forced labor is what stands today. In 1835 a bell was added, as well as a dungeon where violators of the Catholic faith were kept.

There's a convent at the side of the church building and a musem that houses relics from its centuries old past. These antiquities include an ivory statue of Jesus Christ dating back to the 16th century, a statue of the Virgin Mary, St. Ignatius of Loyola’s relics, gold embroidered church vestments, a host of books and hymnals, and 1859 paintings of Liberato Gatchalian, a famous Filipino painter.
Sunset
Unfortunately, photography is not allowed in the museum, so you'll have to come and appreciate all this first hand! It's really amazing how all this stuff can survive time!

After the Baclayon Church, we took a stroll down by the baluarte just across and waited for the sun to set. What a worthy wait it was, as sunsets in the Philippines almost never disappoint. There wasn't much else to do after but head out for dinner.

Isabetlog says:
reflection ng utak mo ya, pauring din! hahaha
Posted on: Jun 21, 2008
planisphere says:
pakshet, paurong kasi basa ko sa blog mo... no need to answer my question sa day 2 mo sa bohol. hehehe
Posted on: Jun 21, 2008
gemahal says:
hi! i wish u have checked out our bohol narra homestay's mangrove too...there's more to discover down there.. =D
Posted on: Apr 28, 2008
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Our lunch - longganisa (sausage) &…
Our lunch - longganisa (sausage) …
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baluarte shed
Baluarte shed
Sunset
Sunset
Where we had our first meal
Where we had our first meal
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Museum
Baclayon Museum
Baclayon Museum
Baclayon Museum
Bicycle
Bicycle
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Baclayon Church
Statue
Statue
Uuuyyyy....
Uuuyyyy....
Bangka
Bangka
Baluarte
Baluarte
Baluarte
Baluarte
Bangka
Bangka
Sunset
Sunset
Sunset
Sunset
Sunset
Sunset
Emie
Emie
Bohol
photo by: ted332