An Organic Life Style, Wwoofing in Kangaroo Valley.

Kangaroo Valley Travel Blog

 › entry 34 of 78 › view all entries

Thursday morning I got up with a big smile on my face, I was leaving Sydney and no longer had to endure a sleepless night in the hostel.  I packed my stuff and chucked it in the boot, then went back to have breakfast.  Some of the people I met sat by me, and as I spoke of my future plans I started to feel quite sad about leaving.  I realised how long I had stayed at the hostel and apart from the month in Brisbane at my auntie’s house, I haven’t been in one place for this length of time since I have started my journey.  My thoughts turned to all the people I have met at Glebe YHA, how we started talking, what we talked about and why I liked them, and it made me very sad to realise, yet again, that most probably we’ll never have another drink together.  This is one aspect of travelling that I just can’t get used to, I don’t make good friends easily and I try to keep in touch with everyone, but it’s hard work!

 

Anyway, the sun was out and I had a two and a half hour drive ahead, so I had to get going.

L to R: Binka, Cloe, Rose, David and me
  I stopped to fill up, got my self a chocolate bar and a bottle of pop, and some treats for Bella, water for cooling system and steering fluid!  I took the M5 out of Sydney, this was the best root according to Philippa.  Cruising away, singing Bohemian Rhapsody till you can’t reach the last notes and you carry on in falsetto pretending you’re really good, I didn’t notice the markings on the road.  It was too late to change lanes when I realised I had missed the ‘cash’ toll barriers and drove straight through the ‘electronic pass’ one, only I didn’t paid for a pass… Bananas!!  What do I do now?  I found the answer on a big yellow signed posted above every lane, a number to ring up and pay the toll.  What a crap system!  On the Severn Bridge in Wales you can’t drive through, even if you have a pass (we call it TAG) you have to stop at the barriers.
Wombat in the middle of the road
  Never mind…

 

It was kind of late when I reached the turning into a road not marked on my sat-nav.  I had a hand drawn map to follow but the light was starting to get dark and it was difficult to see points of reference.  I was looking for a barn when all of a sudden I saw an animal in the middle of the road, looked like a koala.  I stood on the breaks and stopped a few feet away, the beast didn’t budge an inch… what on earth is this dumb animal?  It was a wombat, and I’m so glad I didn’t hit it because apparently it’s just like hitting a rock (or a sheep if you live in Wales).  I had to take some photos.  By the time I got going again it was dark, pitch black.

  Oh dear, I couldn’t see a thing.  I drove a good half hour through a narrow dirt road with woodland all around me, it was quite chilling, but I’m used to this situation.  The only difference here was that I couldn’t even turn the car round.  Eventually I reached a farm, got out and asked for directions.  The old man knew exactly where I was heading and it didn’t take me long to reach my wwoofing hosts, at last!

 

At the farm, I was greeted by two women and a big maremma dog.  The girls were Rose Marie (RM) an American/French wwoofer, and Sue a friend of the family and former wwoofer, the dog is called Binka.  I have read somewhere that women talk on average 10000 words per day, well these two must have saved their share for me because as soon as they sat me down with a cup of tea, they filled me up with every single detail of their lives!  Glad I’m a good listener!  Later David and Rose turned up, the owners of the house, and after introductions we all sat down for a lovely dinner.

David on one of his horses

 

Dave and Rose are really clued-up people, they both have a PhD in English literature and every dinner discussion was greatly fascinating.  Amongst various interests, David is an authority on permaculture (permanent agriculture), he’s been involved in the subject for over twenty years and his vegetable garden is probably the best I will ever see in my travels.  They grow everything in season, and all meals we had were almost entirely picked from the garden.  Even the meat came from pigs and a cow they raised on the farm and recently slaughtered.  Anything else which Rose had to buy from the market was strictly organic.  I must say, her cooking was just amazing; I happily had second and third helpings!  And it was all so healthy.

RM with a horse
  Besides her culinary talent, Rose is also a qualified Yoga teacher, and kept nagging me about my bad posture.  I know I need to sit up straight, but it’s so uncomfortable.   

 

I stayed with them ten days and had a really good time.  My only complaint is that the weather wasn’t too good, as we had a fair few rainy days and the temperature at night was very cold.  Also, because they didn’t normally take two wwoofer at the same time and RM had the room in the house, I ended with the barn, and to keep warm I was sleeping in my sleeping bag under three duvets, a blanket and a sheet!  I could hardly move.

alicegourmet says:
That was really great to have organic vegetables and meat! I wish I could live in a place like this!
Posted on: Aug 10, 2008
Join TravBuddy to leave comments, meet new friends and share travel tips!
L to R: Binka, Cloe, Rose, David a…
L to R: Binka, Cloe, Rose, David …
Wombat in the middle of the road
Wombat in the middle of the road
David on one of his horses
David on one of his horses
RM with a horse
RM with a horse
I look like a priest!
I look like a priest!
RM and the horses
RM and the horses
Binka
Binka
Veggie garden, based on permacultu…
Veggie garden, based on permacult…
Movable chicken pen
Movable chicken pen
organic carrot
organic carrot
Cold nights
Cold nights
I liked this tree
I liked this tree
Road hazard
Road hazard
typical australian landscape
typical australian landscape
Hampden Bridge in Kangaroo valley
Hampden Bridge in Kangaroo valley
Hampden Bridge
Hampden Bridge
Kangaroo Valley
photo by: kiwiasli