Day 35: Caye Caulker

Caye Caulker Travel Blog

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Caye Caulker
 

Barely slept last night. Belize City has quite a few dogs. And dogs in this country are tied up. Outside. All of them. So they try to communicate with their friends across town.

In Mexico dogs always seem to walk around freely, so they can look eachother up whenever they want to. But here everything had to be done via long-distance communications, in other words, barking and howling all around us. All! Night! Long!


In front of the Belizean coast lies the second-largest barrier reef in the world, and within that reef are numerous small islands, named 'cayes' (pronounced: 'keys'). We took the boat to one of these, Caye Caulker, where we would stay for the next three days.

the fastest moving traffic you'll see on Caye Caulker
According to the guidebook this is one of the most laid back and low key of all, uhm, cayes, with palm trees, white beaches but also many backpackers.


From the moment we arrived we felt right at home here. This is like a mini-Jamaica. Rastafarian men with dreadlocks, reggae music playing loudly on every street corner, and everything seemingly goes at a very slow pace. The village on the island is so small that you can walk everywhere. On the street crossings are signs saying “slow” and “stop” but the only traffic on the sandy roads on the island are pedestrians, bicycles and golf carts - all of which travel slow by nature.


We spent most of the day just sitting outside, drinking cocktails, and we looked for interesting tours to do the next couple of days.

A local fisherman and his cat
We booked a snorkelling tour for tomorrow morning.


We had kept in touch with Michael and Christine, the German couple we had spent New Year's with, and had arranged to meet up with them again at Caye Caulker. In the evening we had dinner together with another German couple and a Dutch girl we'd met in the afternoon. Unlike Puerto Ángel lobster season had started in Caye Caulker, so we all gorged on some delicious lobsters, freshly caught that very morning and barbecued to perfection. And all that for next to nothing. Belize may be an expensive country compared to Mexico, but local produce is just dirt, dirt cheap.


After dinner we ended up in one of the many small pubs on the island. We danced to reggae and drank rum cocktails all night long, and Robbel justly remarked that each time we go on a snorkelling tour we are hungover because we've been partying too much with those Germans.

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Caye Caulker
Caye Caulker
the fastest moving traffic youll …
the fastest moving traffic you'll…
A local fisherman and his cat
A local fisherman and his cat
Caye Caulker
Caye Caulker
beach at Caye Caulker
beach at Caye Caulker
the boat to Caye Caulker
the boat to Caye Caulker
On the boat to Caye Caulker
On the boat to Caye Caulker
Caye Caulker
photo by: vulindlela