I Can See For Miles And Miles

Ghorepani Travel Blog

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Kamal and Khim on the path to Ghorepani

I slept well, warm under the thick blanket and was up shortly after 7am. It is another clear day and I take pictures from the roof of the guest house of the view up the valley to Annapurna South. For breakfast I choose pancake with honey and milk coffee, which becomes my regular breakfast throughout the trek; boring but that are quick and cheap and give me a welcome sugar fix first thing in the morning.  My least favorite part of the day, not surprisingly, is the visit to the toilet, so I make it another part of my regular routine to go before breakfast, so I can enjoy the rest of the day.  I hope that I am fortunate and avoid having to make frequent trips to the loo during the night; so far so good.

We start walking by 8:30 continuing up the stone staircase.

Annapurna South from Ghorepani
  It is steep at first but after 30 minutes flattens off as we enter the forest.  After another hour we catch up with a mule train heading up the hill taking the path slowly as there is much snow and ice on the path from the snow falls last week.  The Korean couple we met last night had been unable to reach Annapurna Base Camp (ABC) due to the snow, but Khim seems confident that it will be open when we reach it in a few days time.  Today I carry my large pack and give Khim my day pack, which he agrees to after some discussion. 

 We reach Naya Thanti for an early lunch and arrive at Ghorepani by 1:30pm. Pete is not feeling at all well, so crashes out at the guest house while I explore the village and take photos of the amazing views from here.  Ghorepani is at the top of the pass over to the Jomson valley and has views both East to Annapurna and to Dhawalagiri another 8000m peak further to the West, which the Lonely Planet informs me was once thought to be the highest peak in the world.

Dhawalagiri from Ghorepani
  Sitting outside the guest house in the sun I chat to the owner who speaks good English and she tells me her brother was a British Ghurka and now lives in the UK. 

At about 5pm a group of 3 women arrive having walked today from Tikhedhungga taking them 9 hours.  They are all charity workers from Kathmandu who have a week off, enough time for a short trek to Poon Hill and Ghandruk.  

Pete emerges for dinner looking worse still.  Kamal makes him drink mineral water instead of the local water treated with iodine that he was drinking yesterday.  I also decide to abandon the chlorine tablets as they are also making me feel slightly unwell.

Ghorepani

After dinner we huddle around the wood heater trying to keep warm, but failing.  The daughter of the house entertains the guides with her lively conversation, talking non-stop for well over an hour.  After the city it is a pleasant surprise to see the women here are so assertive and confident.  Kamal tells me that it is a feature of the women from this district in Nepal and that the women in the Everest region are not the same; “only asking for money” he says.

We retire early, party due to the cold, but also because we need to be up at 5am for the sunrise at Poon Hill tomorrow.

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Kamal and Khim on the path to Ghor…
Kamal and Khim on the path to Gho…
Annapurna South from Ghorepani
Annapurna South from Ghorepani
Dhawalagiri from Ghorepani
Dhawalagiri from Ghorepani
Ghorepani
Ghorepani
Ghorepani
Ghorepani
Kamal and Pete (not looking so wel…
Kamal and Pete (not looking so we…
Khim and girl from Gorepani GH
Khim and girl from Gorepani GH
Ghorepani
photo by: stefmuts