PLANE, BUS, SKYWALK, HUALAPAI TRIBE, & GRUB

Grand Canyon Travel Blog

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ALMOST THERE...
THIS IS LOCATED ON THE WEST RIM OF THE GRAND CANYON. THE SACRED LAND OF THE HUALAPAI INDIANS.

The Grand Canyon Skywalk is a tourist attraction along the Colorado River on the edge of the Grand Canyon (Grand Canyon West) in the U.S. state of Arizona.

Commissioned by the Hualapai Indian tribe, it was unveiled March 20, 2007, and opened to the general public on March 28, 2007. It is accessed via the Grand Canyon West terminal or 120 miles (190 km) drive from Las Vegas (which includes an unpaved and bumpy 14 miles (23 km) stretch). A walk on the skywalk is available for a twenty five dollar admission fee, payable to the Hualapai Indian tribe at the Skywalk itself.

The horseshoe-shaped glass walkway, at a 1,200 meter (4,000 ft) height above the floor of the canyon exceeds those of the world's largest skyscrapers.
OUR BUS TO SKYWALK
The Skywalk is not directly above the main canyon, Granite Gorge, which contains the Colorado River, but instead extends over a side canyon and affords a view into the main canyon.  the elevation at the Skywalk's location as 1454 m (4,770 ft) and the elevation of the Colorado River in the base of the canyon as 354 m (1,161 ft).

Skywalk protrudes 20 meters (65 ft) beyond the edge of the canyon. The walls and floor are built from glass 10.2 cm (4 inches) thick. The glass on both edges of the floor is tinted and can be used as a "safe zone" by scared visitors. The Skywalk is capable of holding 70 tons of weight (the equivalent of 800 people weighing 80 kg (175 lb.) each), however the permitted capacity is limited to 120 persons. Visitors are provided with shoe covers to protect them from slipping and to prevent the glass floor from being scratched.
YAY I DID IT - PROFESSIONAL PAID PHOTOS
However, quite a few light scratches were visible already in September 2007.

Construction began in March 2004. It was rolled onto the edge of the canyon on March 7, 2007 after passing several days of testing to replicate weather, strength and endurance conditions of its final destination. The structure was built to withstand up to 100 mph (160 km/h) winds and a magnitude 8 earthquake. Tuned mass dampers were used to minimize vibration from wind and pedestrians.

Cornerstone of a larger plan

According to Hualapai officials, the cost of the Skywalk alone will exceed $40 million. Future plans for the Grand Canyon Skywalk complex include a museum, movie theater, VIP lounge, gift shop, and several restaurants including a high-end restaurant called The Skywalk Café where visitors will be able to dine outdoors at the canyon's rim.
ME AND A HUALAPAI INDIAN
The Skywalk is the cornerstone of a larger plan by the Hualapai tribe, which it hopes will be the catalyst for a 9,000 acre (36 km²) development to be called Grand Canyon West: it would open up a 100 miles (160 km) stretch along the canyon's South Rim and include hotels, restaurants, a golf course and a cable car to ferry visitors from the canyon rim to the Colorado River, which has been previously inaccessible.

The tribe partnered with businessman David Jin to raise the money for the project.

No Cameras Allowed

Many visitors have complained about the unusual rule that no cameras are permitted on the skywalk. The tribe claims that this is to protect the glass from being scratched, while critics believe that this is more to preserve their ability to sell postcards and other stock images.
TIPIS


The Hualapai (also spelled Walapai) are a tribe of Native Americans who live in the mountains of northwestern Arizona, United States. The name is derived from "hwal," the Yuman word for pine, "Hualapai" meaning "people of the tall pine". Their traditional territory is a 100 mile (160 km) stretch along the pine-clad southern side of the Grand Canyon with the tribal capital located at Peach Springs.

Guano Point

This is where the place we are having lunch. During the 1950's and 60's bat guano (dung) was mined from a cave across the canyon and trammed backed on cables. Rich in nitrate it was used for the production of makeup, fertilizer and explosives.
Some of the mining relics still exist and are very interesting.

NOTE: THE GUANO BAT POOP IS THE MAIN INGREDIENT  OF MASCARA.....HMMMMMM I AM GLAD I DON'T WEAR MAKE UP :P

Lunch is served here and you are able to dine at picnic tables outside under a large tarp. It was comforting to see the natives and workers also eating the same meals.

I went hiking down where the guano mines cable car. this is where the scene from "THELMA AND LOUISE" when they drove off the cliff. the cars they used for the film are still down the shaft.

Here we were able to do some hiking and discovery. By far, this was the highlight of the tour and provided many perspectives of both solitude and natural appreciation of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River. As with the other sites, caution should be exercised as no fencing or railing is provided along the paths.

There were also many vendors offering handmade Hualapai Indian jewelry and art for sale. The prices seemed reasonable but are negotiable.


walterman9999 says:
Thanks for the info, but I will pass. At Peach Springs you can get a camp permit for Diamond Creek where you can take a high cleareance vehicle to the bottom of the Grand Canyon and camp by the river. The first 20 miles is through a good dirt road through the beautiful Peach Spring Canyon. Then you get to Diamond Creek Canyon and have to drive through water for the last two miles. Passable in two wheel drive but be careful to avoid the larger rocks. The indians are friendly, but will check to see that you have your permit. They pick up many river rafters there so they do work on the road (trail).
Posted on: Dec 14, 2013
sylviandavid says:
great blog... I enjoyed it.. sylvia
Posted on: Jul 09, 2009
ashleynpearson says:
Great blog! I have always wanted to go there!!
Posted on: Feb 12, 2008
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ALMOST THERE...
ALMOST THERE...
OUR BUS TO SKYWALK
OUR BUS TO SKYWALK
YAY I DID IT - PROFESSIONAL PAID P…
YAY I DID IT - PROFESSIONAL PAID …
ME AND A HUALAPAI INDIAN
ME AND A HUALAPAI INDIAN
TIPIS
TIPIS
HUALAPAI TRIBAL DANCE
HUALAPAI TRIBAL DANCE
HUALAPAI TRIBAL DANCE
HUALAPAI TRIBAL DANCE
PROFESSIONAL PAID PICS
PROFESSIONAL PAID PICS
YAY I DID IT - PROFESSIONAL PAID P…
YAY I DID IT - PROFESSIONAL PAID …
PROFESSIONAL PAID PICS
PROFESSIONAL PAID PICS
PROFESSIONAL PAID PICS - WE DID I…
PROFESSIONAL PAID PICS - "WE DID …
EAGLE POINT
EAGLE POINT
EAGLE POINT
EAGLE POINT
SKYWALK VIEW
SKYWALK VIEW
EAGLE POINT
EAGLE POINT
SKYWALK EARLY STAGES
SKYWALK EARLY STAGES
SKYWALK
SKYWALK
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
LUNCH TIME
LUNCH TIME
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
OUR VIEW
OUR VIEW
SHREEDED PORK, CARROTS, CORN, CORN…
SHREEDED PORK, CARROTS, CORN, COR…
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
GUANO MINES CABLE CAR
GUANO MINES CABLE CAR
GUANO POINT
GUANO POINT
THE ONLY JAPANESE COWBOY I KNOW :)
THE ONLY JAPANESE COWBOY I KNOW :)
FLYING OVER THE "WEST RIM" OF THE…
Grand Canyon Sights & Attractions review
I would recommend coming here. there are NO CAMERAS AND NO CEL PHONES allowed on the skywalk. you are asked to put you belongings in a locker which is… read entire review
242 km (150 miles) traveled
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photo by: Sunflower300