How do you like your eggs in the morning?

Haliburton Travel Blog

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Our motel!

Wow, where do I start? Well on Thursday we headed up to Haliburton on the coach, not really knowing what to expect, so a little bit nervous. The journey took about 4 hours and was fine, no ex convicts or anything like what we had been warned about! The closer we got the more snow there was and the fewer people on the bus, until we got to the end of the line and it was only us and one other guy left. Luckily the motel was just by the stop or I don’t know what we would have done! We found the office and checked ourselves in with the owner (an interesting guy). He spoke with a very strong accent (think Forrest Gump) and said “yoooo Bridish?” (we say yes) “Ah cuud teeeyelll!” So off we trundle to cabin number 6. It was cold and a bit grubby but nothing that couldn’t be lived with (well for 2 nights anyway!). However, we had to have the heater on all night and it sounded a bit like a jet engine, but louder.

 

Anyway, in the morning we decided to have a walk around the village and have breakfast in the local diner.

Snowy Haliburton
Yay, a proper diner, with locals! Everyone knew everybody else and it was all back slapping and friendliness, excellent! Then came the million dollar question. How do you want your eggs?

 

“Um, I’ve never been asked that before, which is which?”

“D’ya wanna dip your toast?”

“Yes!”

“Over-easy”

 

Haha, perfect! Plus for $4 (2 Pounds) I got 2 eggs, 2 toast, 3 sausages and fried potato thingys, can’t complain!!

 

Anyway, so to dog sledding (via a very long and expensive cab ride).

The handlers say hello!
We had arrived a bit early so were asked to help the people going on a different trip to harness up their dogs! There were some TV crews filming for a local channel so we watched the owner show off his favourite dogs first. The dogs were absolutely beautiful, the handlers knew every single name, and which dogs worked well together and which fought.

 

We had a short lesson about the commands to use and how to fix any problems encountered, then were told that as far as possible we were to sort out any mishaps ourselves. The guide would be up ahead, and if we needed him we had to call. If the dogs (there were 5 to our sled) got tangled up etc, we had to stop the sled and the passenger must get out and sort them out. It seemed like a lot of responsibility, but it was great to feel in charge of the dogs! I started off as the sledder with Lisa the passenger, then we swapped over.

 

To make them go, you had to shout “Hike” then push the sled, then they take off and you have to hope you’re on it! There were other commands such as “easy”, “woah”, “on by” and “STOP CHEWING”  (because if they chew through the rope, the front dogs will escape!).

Through the trail
It was all going swimmingly until our dogs decided that trying to run up a hill dragging us was a bit like hard work (fair point!), so I had to sort up run with the sled shouting “hike, hike”!! Nearly killed me. We went through the trail for about 15 mins then onto the frozen lake, wow, we were both just grinning like loons!

 

Once we had gone up another hill (Lisa shouting this time), we turned the dogs around and started back, but downhill! You had to be really careful not to go too fast because the sled can pick up momentum and bash the back dogs, so one foot was on the brake all the time. However this is quite difficult when you have to swap feet to try and lean to steer. We went back onto the lake. Perhaps I took it too fast. Perhaps the dogs decided that they wanted to go in the opposite direction. Either way the sled went sideways and tipped Lisa out! Now we had been warned about this NEVER LET GO, the dogs will go crazy and run away and probably injure themselves because they are attached to the harnesses. Ok, I of course panicked and let go immediately leaving Lisa to be dragged half way across the lake on her front (good girl, she didn’t let go even when the ice pick looked like it might impale her skull!).

Saying thanks to our dogs
Don’t worry, it was all fine. The guide commended us (her) on her reactions, and we carried on, albeit a little bruised!

 

We got back to base uneventfully and helped them untie the dogs and give them treats before talking some more photos! It really was an amazing experience.

 

After we got back, we showered (god those dogs STINK!) and managed to find a Chinese restaurant in the village, before crawling exhausted into bed! We’re back in Toronto now, getting ready for the temperature drop tomorrow (CLICK ME!!) we’ll go to Niagara on Monday I think!!

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Our motel!
Our motel!
Snowy Haliburton
Snowy Haliburton
The handlers say hello!
The handlers say hello!
Through the trail
Through the trail
Saying thanks to our dogs
Saying thanks to our dogs
Lisa helps harness them
Lisa helps harness them
Beautiful huskies
Beautiful huskies
More huskies!
More huskies!
Onto the frozen lake
Onto the frozen lake
More gorgeous huskies!
More gorgeous huskies!
Haliburton
photo by: portia