sand, seals, and sea

Cape Cross Travel Blog

 › entry 11 of 16 › view all entries
north namibian landscape

To get to cape cross we had a lot of nothingness to cross, unfortunately we had a problem with the truck and were stuck in the baking heat in the absolute middle of nowhere for a good 2-3hrs. This wasn't the kind of place you want to break down in as we were on a road that i would guess is only really used once a week at best, luckily we had filled up with water back at the camp. When we got towards the ocean nobody was really sure if it was just a mirage from the heat like soo many we'd seen so there was quite a cheer when it was confirmed that the atlantic was right in front of us. It's not called the skeleton coast for nothing, it's hard to see how anything could survive out here. We joined the main road that runs along the coast and was filled with 4x4s with huge fishing rods stuck to the front and eventually made it to the cape cross seal reserve.

seal pup sunning themself
we'd ben told that recently the seals were being culled and to be honest there was evidence of that when we got up close. The seals litterally covered the beach for 100s of meters in each direction. At the car park there's a little walk way which is raised up so you can walk out and over the seals, if you can stand the smell!! It was great walking round and seeing the seals in their natural habitat, but the shine is kind of taken off it by all the dead seal pups lying around on the beach. These didn't look like they'd been culled but were more likely a result of losing their mother and being squashed by fighting adults. There was a little area to sit down and watch the seals from but this was filled with more dead seals that didn't look like accidental deaths.
loads of seals

After having our fill of how harsh life was in these parts for the seals we headed off up the coast to make camp, and a huge fire courtesy of some dead trees we'd picked up in the cheetah farm. When we told the people at the seal colony that we were off for a swim in the atlantic, they said we were crazy because nobody ever swims in the sea up here. This was pretty much the response of our guide saying we'd only get wet upto the knees before running out screaming how cold it was. So Xmas eve after we'd lit the fire 8 of us went for a swim as the sun was going down. Yep it was cold, but not quite ice cold (i believe it was about 6-7degrees) although the savanahs supped prior to going in probably helped a bit!! sleeping out under the stars,  on xmas eve miles away from anyone,  with only jackals for company was awesome, as we sat by the fire, drinking beer/wine/vodka/cider guessing what various friends would be upto back home in our respective countries, and singing (well trying to) christmas carols, trying to guess who each others secret santa was, was an agreat feeling.

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north namibian landscape
north namibian landscape
seal pup sunning themself
seal pup sunning themself
loads of seals
loads of seals
the big daddy
the big daddy
game of football in the middle of …
game of football in the middle of…
xmas swim in the atlantic
xmas swim in the atlantic
beach fire
beach fire
xmas eve camp
xmas eve camp
Cape Cross
photo by: Biedjee