Last day on Cayman Brac

Cayman Brac Travel Blog

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Find the fish
    Our last day on Cayman Brac was one of the best. We all got up at a semi-reasonable time, and while our attempt at swimming in the water back behind our house were thwarted by the waves that were still large enough to make us fear getting knocked off our feet and into some wonderful sea urchins, we still got a lot in.

    We started off, once again, in the one place that was sheltered enough to be able to snorkel comfortably, where the dock blocked the waves. Our last day on Cayman Brac was also the calmest as far as the wind and water go, and it was also the best snorkeling of the week. There were definitely more fish than there had been just one day earlier, which was most likely due to the fact that the waves had calmed and the water was very clear.
BARRACUDA!!!
We saw two stingray...one that was a very small male, and one that was a much larger (at least 3ft across) female...that greated each other and then went their separate ways. We also saw a barracuda...not as large as the one we saw last year at Eden Rock on Grand Cayman, but it was large enough and stayed around long enough that I could snap a few pictures of it. I also managed to feed my addiction and stalk a few more parrot fish...haha. They're so beautiful, I can't help it!

    After around an hour, we headed back over to the Brac Reef Resort to relax on the beach (still empty). Soon after we showed up and settled in, one of the guys (named BJ) from the Reef Divers diving company came over to us and started up a conversation.
Two stingrays, greeting each other. The small one is a male and the large one is a female
BJ is 20 years old, his mom is from California and his dad is from Cayman Brac, he's been diving since he was in high school (they have a course in it), he's working on an online degree in marine biology, and he's the owner of the car that we saw the day before with the windshield sun deflector that makes his car look like it has eyes. He was pretty cool. He told us a lot of stories about things he's seen while diving (hammerhead shark, flying gurnard, scorpion fish, green moray eel, sea horses, sea turtles, etc.)...and he was kind enough to answered all of our questions about the Cayman Islands...
  • What citizenship do Caymanians have? (They are citizens of the Cayman Islands but their passports also count as passports from the UK...although BJ has US citizenship on top of that, due to the fact that his mother is from California.
    Sunset from Brac Reef Resort
    )
  • Does the Cayman Islands accept pounds? (NO, they only accept Caymanian money and USD.)
  • How do the insanely large hermit crabs up on the bluff, 140ft above the water, get their huge shells? (They mate in the water every year, so they come down...apparently they climb down from the bluff to mate in the water, get new shells, and then head back up.)
  • What do hermit crabs eat? (According to BJ, they eat anything...even new born kittens...so if you're ever in the Cayman Islands and see some cats walking around without tails or missing legs, it's because hermit crabs got to them as kittens.)
  • Where do people from Cayman Brac go to college, if they do? (Grand Cayman has a university, but the majority either go to the US or get degrees online.)
    BJ was awesome.
Sunset from Brac Reef Resort
..very friendly, as the locals all are, and he knew a lot about diving and stuff. I showed him a bunch of my pictures from snorkeling and he told me the names of fish I was interested in. (We exchanged emails and he sent me some really amazing pictures from his dives...I have to start diving!) He also had a sweet accent...he was the first person to have the accent as described in Horizons, the magazine put out by Cayman Airways:
    "English is spoken on all three islands. Dialect and intonations used by Caymanians have puzzled some linguists but you'll have no difficulty communicating with them. Their speech is a mixture of American Southern drawl and the English slur with a Scottish lilt to end a statement, all combined to fall charmingly on the ears.
Eagle rays
You'll enjoy the twist, a fascinating singsong of Cornish, Irish, Scottish and Welsh."
    It's an awesome accent to listen to, and completely understandable, too. We definitely didn't mind talking with him. So yeah, that's what we did for like five hours...and the sunset that evening was AMAZING so my parents didn't mind staying around while my sister and I hung out with BJ. After the sunset, we went back to our house, packed up all of our stuff and then went to bed, so we could wake up bright and early to jump on the little plane back to Grand Cayman.
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Find the fish
Find the fish
BARRACUDA!!!
BARRACUDA!!!
Two stingrays, greeting each other…
Two stingrays, greeting each othe…
Sunset from Brac Reef Resort
Sunset from Brac Reef Resort
Sunset from Brac Reef Resort
Sunset from Brac Reef Resort
Eagle rays
Eagle rays
I have a habit of following parrot…
I have a habit of following parro…
Small male stingray
Small male stingray
Chasing parrot fish again
Chasing parrot fish again
There are five fish in this pictur…
There are five fish in this pictu…
Caught a peacock flounder on the m…
Caught a peacock flounder on the …
Sunset from Brac Reef Resort
Sunset from Brac Reef Resort
Aztec temple in the sand on the Br…
Aztec temple in the sand on the B…
Cayman Brac
photo by: smhirsch