Off to Colonia

Colonia del Sacramento Travel Blog

 › entry 95 of 177 › view all entries
The old wharf which is now used by sporting boats and tourists.

Johnny dropped us at Tres Cruces this morning to catch our bus to Colonia, only about 2 hours north west of Montevideo.  Ignacio met us at the station to say goodbye, and then we headed off at 11.30am.  When we arrived at the hostel, which we´d booked a week before, the girl claimed not to have our booking but suddenly said it was all OK when I told her I´d kept all the emails confirming the booking and could show her if she wanted!  Went for a quick walk around town, got some groceries and then back to the room to plan our course of action.  Cooked spaghetti for dinner - kitchen here is basially one stove so would be hell in the busy summer time trying to get access to it.

The City Gate within the remains of the town wall.

3 June:
Spent today following the walking tour on the local info map.  None of the museums open until 11.15am, so had a coffee at Mercosur, one of the only cafes in town open in the morning.  Not all of the museums are open each day, so we had to make sure we went to the right ones!  You buy one ticket for U$50 which then gives you access to all of them, they just sign your entrance ticket when you go in.  First stop on our walk was the Porton de Campo, the old city gate next to the ruins of the drawbridge and city wall.  You can see the busy ferry port from the end of the wall.  Walked up to the Calle de los Suspiros with its cobblestones and early colonial houses, then up to the Portuguese Museumj on the Plaza Mayor.  The museum is in an 18th century stone house and is filled with replicas of early Portuguese furniture, decorative arts and uniforms.

Calle de los Suspiros, an old Portuguese street with original homes.
  From what we could tell, nothing is original in this musuem, it is all replicas.  Further along the Plaza we saw the remains of the San Francisco Convent, which was built in 1694 and burnt down about 10 years later.  The lighthouse is built right at the edge of the convent, but was closed when we went by.  The Tile Museum is just around the corner, and has three rooms housing a very small collection of tiles from the early 19th century, including the first tiles made in Uruguay.  The building housing the museum dates from the 1750s.  A few steps up the street took us to the Regional Archive, once again only two rooms.  The main room contains finds from the excavation of the Governors´ Residence and the second a few paintings and lots of books you cannot touch.  After lunch, we walked towards the old port and visited the Indigenous Musuem, up steep steps into a freezing cold couple of rooms containing lots of stones used by the local indigenous groups.  Walked back around to the Basilica of the Holy Sacrament, a very simple church of thick Portuguese walls with refreshingly little decoration.  We finished our day at the 1866 wharf, which has been restored and is now used by sport boats.

Join TravBuddy to leave comments, meet new friends and share travel tips!
The old wharf which is now used by…
The old wharf which is now used b…
The City Gate within the remains o…
The City Gate within the remains …
Calle de los Suspiros, an old Port…
Calle de los Suspiros, an old Por…
The lighthouse and remains of the …
The lighthouse and remains of the…