Museums of Cordoba

Cordoba Travel Blog

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So THAT´S what the Argentinian veterans think of Britain!

Today ended up being a fairly relaxed day, and most enjoyable in the sunshine and balmy weather of Cordoba.  We can still walk around in t-shirts, so very comfortable for sightseeing.  Our first stop was the Jesuit Crypt, which was rediscovered under a main street in the city during the 1980s when telephone cable was being laid.  It is quite a small museum, with a few exhibits of items found during the excavations, but it was never actually used as a burial site, and therefore the historical interest is limited (apart from the construction itself).

We then went across to the Memorial to the Disappeared, which is in the old secret police complex between the Cabildo and the Cathedral.  There is not English explanation here, which is a pity as it is such an important part of Argentinian history.

Malvinas veteran explaining why the Malvinas will NEVER be British (and with a side line in what he´d like to do to those who say it is!)
  The building itself is quite plain - you can see a couple of the cells, and documents relating to the detainees and what happened to them.  It is quite moving and eerie, knowing now what happened in the centre of a busy city right next to the main cathedral and town square.

Before lunch, we managed to do the last tour at the Juan de Tejeda Museum of Religious Art which is found within the old convent grounds across from the Cathedral.  The founder was a grand nephew of St Theresa of Avila, the convent´s patron.  The tour was in Spanish, but very interesting and detailed and took about 45 minutes.  There are some fascinating artefacts here, including many Cuzco school paintings, a crucifx that belonged to St Ignatius Loyola and signed by him, and a stuffing Philippine crucifix made of ivory.

Graffiti on the wall of the Memorial to the Disappeared.
  Certainly well worth seeing, but beware as it is only open in the mornings.

We then adjourned to the Founders Square for lunch, where we came upon our new friend David so sat ourselves down for a very relaxed three hour lunch!!  Also amused ourselves watching the ´Malvinas for Argentina´display on the other side of the square - lots of very anti-British sentiment, so Noel was carefully cultivating his Australian accent!

Then spent a couple of hours wandering around, as our English tour of the Museum of the National University of Cordoba didn´t start until 6pm.  We had a very friendly law student as a guide, who took us through the Jesuit Church, the domestic chapel, the university square and the Jesuit library.  The library is fascinating with some very old books, several from the Guthenberg press and dating back to the late 1400s.  We saw the ornate graduation room and cringed as our guide explained how the students burned all of the old furniture in the 1918 ´revoluation´which changed the way the university is run.  The uni is now state run, fully government funded and extremely prestigious - entry is by examination, but there is no quota.  If you pass the exam to the required standard, you get in and don´t have to pay any fees at any time.

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So THAT´S what the Argentinian ve…
So THAT´S what the Argentinian v…
Malvinas veteran explaining why th…
Malvinas veteran explaining why t…
Graffiti on the wall of the Memori…
Graffiti on the wall of the Memor…
A couple of the cells in the build…
A couple of the cells in the buil…
Interior of the Religious Art Musu…
Interior of the Religious Art Mus…
Interior courtyard of the National…
Interior courtyard of the Nationa…
Main altar in the church next to t…
Main altar in the church next to …
Pregnant Virgin in the Natives Cha…
Pregnant Virgin in the Natives Ch…
Cordoba
photo by: sissanoel