Federal Police Museum

Buenos Aires Travel Blog

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The first room of the Police Musuem, featuring uniforms through the ages.

Had big plans today for seeing some more museums, but the two main ones were ´shut for renovations´or ´shut and don´t know where the stuff has gone!!´.  We had lunch at home and then headed out into the thick fog to the Museo Mitre in San Martin - found a sign on the door saying it´s closed for renovations.  This is becoming a habit here, we are told by tourist info centres that places are open and then turn up to find that they have been closed for a while.  The official tourist info offices here are not the most reliable or informative, although we have struck a couple of really helpful people who don´t try to shove you onto commercial tours.  Went across the road to the Federal Police Musuem to be told it would be open at 2pm (about 20 minutes away).

The cap of a policeman saved by his badge! You can see the bullet hole right in the top of the metal hat badge, so he was very lucky.
  Went and had a coffee, then came back at 2pm to be told it would open at 3pm!  In the meantime we went down to the Central Post Office, which is supposed to be housing a modern art collection from the modern art gallery which is closed.  After it became obvious that there was nothing here but offices, we asked a guard who told us that there was nothing here anymore and he had no idea where it had gone!  (The lady we saw at the Puerto Madero tourist infor office the next day was most surprised to hear this!).

Went back to the Police Museum at 3pm to find it open, and looked after by a very friendly lady whose brother-in-law is Australian, so we got in for free (although the book says there´s a small charge).  This is a very worthwhile museum with interesting items such as uniforms, old police and fire brigade equipment, information about finger printing and identification as well as evidence from various notorious crimes.

The gambling room, featuring equipment confiscated during raids.
  We liked the life-size mock-up of how to blow open a safe (very informative!).  Also a room containing items in which illegal gaming equipment was hidden, including a mobile, collapsible cock-fighting ring (complete with mangy looking chooks).  Every branch of criminal activity is covered and well explained (although in Spanish, so a little knowledge would be necessary).
WARNING: *** The last two rooms are extremely graphic and gruesome and certainly not for the faint-hearted or children.  They contain crime scene photographs and evidence from murders, suicides and accidents and leave nothing to the imagination.  Photos are included of human remains following collisions with trains, shootings, knifings, dismemberments and so on and while the information about the police case and how the crimes were solved is fascinating, the pictures may be very difficult for some to bear.  Noel is not someone who can sit through an episode of ER without closing his eyes, so found this area quite heavy going!
Overall, the museum is definitely worth a visit, although not well advertised.

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The first room of the Police Musue…
The first room of the Police Musu…
The cap of a policeman saved by hi…
The cap of a policeman saved by h…
The gambling room, featuring equip…
The gambling room, featuring equi…
How to crack open a safe -very edu…
How to crack open a safe -very ed…
Protective glass plate and the cof…
Protective glass plate and the co…
The gun room in the Police Musuem,…
The gun room in the Police Musuem…