Lake Champlain Bridge and Crown Point State Historic Site

Crown Point State Historic Site - NY Travel Blog

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The new bridge

In the blog of my first visit to the Adirondacks on in May 2009 I made a one-liner notification that I visited the State of Vermont for a few minutes. I did that by crossing the Champlain Bridge, a beautiful iconic steel bridge that dated back to 1929. In October that same year, after some basic checks, it was discovered that this bridge's structural integrity had decreased significantly and in such an extent that it could collapse at any moment.

It was closed immediately, and later it was decided that demolition and replacement would be the only solution for this interstate bridge, one of only two bridges that crosses Lake Champlain. Demolition by explosives occurred on the 28th of December 2009. A nice video of the explosive demolition can be seen here.

The remains of the British fort
An interesting historic video of the opening of the old bridge is here.

The States of Vermont and New York acted very fast and efficient. A new bridge was constructed and opened on the 7th of November 2011. Less than two years after the demolition. I wanted to see this new bridge, so, on my way from Lake Placid back home I made a detour via Crown Point to see what the new Lake Champlain Bridge looks like. I was not disappointed. The bridge is built more or less in the style of its predecessor, although it contains more concrete. Yet, the old bridge had definitively more grandeur.

Being at that spot I also took a quick look in Crown Point State Historic Site.

The remains of the British fort
Apart from the bridges there have been much older structures at this site. The lake is at this point very narrow (hence the bridge) so it is a strategic point. Because of that the French constructed Fort St. Frédéric at this site, in 1734. The fort was never attacked, yet demolished in 1759 when the French had to withdraw for the advancing British army. The British built an even bigger fort next to the ruins of the French fort, Fort Crown Point. This fort was also never attacked and also abandoned by the British. Remains of both forts are still visible and accessible today.

Another icon nearby is the Crown Point Lighthouse. The original lighthouse at the edge of the narrow part of the lake was opened in 1858. It was a simple lighthouse with a keeper's house attached.

Crown Point Lighthouse
At the celebration of the 300th "birthday" of the explorations of Samuel de Champlain, it was decided to convert one of the lake's lighthouses into a memorial lighthouse. The Crown Point Lighthouse was chosen. The stone tower was stripped away from the inside spiral staircase and an impressive sturcture with Doric columns was replaced. Including a statue of the French discoverer. The keeper's house has been torn down. The lighthouse / monument is still there.

More pictures below, and a nice vintage picture of the British fort ruins can be seen hereDeze fake-tekst heb ik toegevoegd om net iets meer regels te genereren zodat deze rare website toestaat dat de bijgesloten foto ook vertoond wordt. Deze fake-tekst heb ik toegevoegd om net iets meer regels te genereren zodat deze rare website toestaat dat de 

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The new bridge
The new bridge
The remains of the British fort
The remains of the British fort
The remains of the British fort
The remains of the British fort
Crown Point Lighthouse
Crown Point Lighthouse
The new bridge
The new bridge
The new bridge
The new bridge
View over Lake Champlain towards t…
View over Lake Champlain towards …
The remains of Fort Frédéric
The remains of Fort Frédéric
The new bridge, seen from Fort Fr…
The new bridge, seen from Fort Fr…
The remains of the British fort
The remains of the British fort
The remains of the British fort
The remains of the British fort
The remains of the British fort
The remains of the British fort
The ruins of the British fort as t…
The ruins of the British fort as …
Crown Point State Historic Site - NY
photo by: mdalamers