Dutch houses in NYC: Adriance Farmhouse

Queens - NY Travel Blog

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Adriance Farmhouse

My car was once more due for maintenance. The dealership had warned me this would be a big one, and it would take a long time to process. So, I delivered the blue Mazda at 9:30 pm at my dealer in Queens. To my surprise I got a call around noon that it was ready. This gave me some time to do some sightseeing in Queens.

I decided to visit another site from my book "Exploring Historic Dutch New York", see also (here, and here): the Adriance Farmhouse. The history of this farm goes back to 1772 when Jacob and Catherine Adriance built the first part of the farm on land that had come in the Adriance family around 1697.

Adriance Farmhouse
The farm was constructed in Dutch style. Throughout the history the farm was sold and bought several times. In 1855, the current owner, Peter Cox, expanded the structure to almost twice the original size. The farm prospered and when it was sold by Cox's son in 1892 it was worth 20.000 USD, the second largest and most expensive farm in Queens!

In 1920 the farm was sold to the state, and became later a therapeutic hospital. This probably saved the structure from demolition, since all around the farm Queens was growing and developing. Later the farm was turned into a museum, the Queens County Farm Museum. Due to this development the Adriance Farmhouse is still operating as a farm, and probably the oldest still operating farm in the state. The Adriance House is currently a New York City Landmark and registered as a National Historic Place.

Livestock

The farm museum is like an island in the city. Like the other historic Dutch houses it is surrounded by the modern buildings, industries, and roads. But because there is still a lot of farm land it actually feels like being in the country side. The museum collection of cows, chickens, goats, even alpacas, and the fields contribute to that feeling too.

At the time I arrived the farm house was, unfortunately closed, according to a sign at the door. When I stared through the windows I saw some people inside the farm. When I walked past the main entrance the door opened and the people I had seen walked out and told me I could have a look. I thought these persons belonged to the museum's staff, so I walked into the farm and looked around, enjoying the fact that I was the only guest. Later, I found out that the persons that kindly "allowed" me to go inside were just visitors too.

More pictures below!

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Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
Livestock
Livestock
Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
Inside Adriance Farmhouse
Inside Adriance Farmhouse
Inside Adriance Farmhouse
Inside Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
Adriance Farmhouse
A nice painting inside Adriance Fa…
A nice painting inside Adriance F…
Chickens
Chickens
Sunflowers
Sunflowers
Grapes
Grapes
Flowers
Flowers
A vintage traktor
A vintage traktor
More sunflower
More sunflower
Adriance Farmhouse in 1927 (photo:…
Adriance Farmhouse in 1927 (photo…
Queens - NY
photo by: mdalamers