London I: The British Museum

London Travel Blog

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Victorian standpipe (1867).

Our British Airways flight from Washington arrived at Heathrow at 10:15 a.m. Customs and baggage claim were smooth and soon were were meeting our ground transporation. We arranged ground transportation to our hotel (and later to Southampton) through Princess Cruises. Unlike the typical situation of joining with fellow passengers on a motorcoach, we found this time we had a private driver and car (a Mercedes no less) waiting for us! 

The M4 Motorway brought us from Heathrow to London. The first sight of London proper was the tower of the London Museum of Water & Steam. The Victorian era tower was once a standpipe for the Kew Bridge Pumping Station.

Victoria & Albert Museum.
The M4 devolved into a series of famous thoroughfares passing the Victoria & Albert Museum, Harrod's, Piccadilly Circus and Trafalgar Square. A mini tour of London before arriving at our hotel in Holborn!

Ensconced in our hotel (the Grange Holborn Hotel), the question was how to best use the afternoon. Rain threatened, so our decision was the British Musuem over the Tower of London. This turned out to be a wise move as showers shortly appeared. 

The British Musuem was less than five blocks for the hotel. On the way, we passed Bloombury Square. The queue at the museum gates was long, everyone seeing it as a refuge from the rain. By the time our place arrived at the gates, the guard announced the front entrance was closed due to the number of people in the security queue. We would all have to go to the rear entrance. It was just as long again a wait there, as the rear entrance is the tour group and motorcoach entrance. But finally, we were inside! We headed straight for...the museum cafe. The British Museum has a nice one with a grab and go selection of sandwiches. There are cakes, too, but a sandwich and crisps for lunch was our thinking. Now it was time for the main event. We saw the Rosetta Stone, Elgin Marbles, Assyrian Winged Lion, cuneiform tablets and the Mausoleum of Halikarnassos, among the many exhibts of classical antiquity.

In the evening, we returned to the vicinity of the musuem for dinner at the Museum Pub.

vicIII says:
Well done! I see you had a great visit!:)
Posted on: Sep 27, 2017
Toonsarah says:
I admire your patience in queuing twice for the museum! The Museum Tavern is one of my favourite London pubs, albeit on the small side ;)
Posted on: Sep 25, 2017
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Victorian standpipe (1867).
Victorian standpipe (1867).
Victoria & Albert Museum.
Victoria & Albert Museum.
Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields.
Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields.
Nelsons Column, Trafalgar Square.
Nelson's Column, Trafalgar Square.
The National Gallery.
The National Gallery.
Statue of Charles James Fox (1749-…
Statue of Charles James Fox (1749…
Terraces in Great Russell Street.
Terraces in Great Russell Street.
Terraces in Great Russell Street.
Terraces in Great Russell Street.
German Historical Institute in Blo…
German Historical Institute in Bl…
Southampton Row
Southampton Row
Central Saint Martins College of A…
Central Saint Martins College of …
London Bus.
London Bus.
London Sights & Attractions review
The Centre of Antiquity
The British Museum was founded in the mid-18th century. It began in a former great house located on the same spot where it is now. The museum's 19th c… read entire review
London Restaurants, Cafes & Food review
A Pub Near the British Museum
We enjoyed dinner at the Museum Tavern, located right across the street from the British Museum. Tables can be booked in advance (by telephone or onli… read entire review
London
photo by: ulysses