Hobart

Hobart Travel Blog

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Salamanca Square

Today we started the day at a recommended bakery-cafe in Battery Point called Jackman & McRoss. Here we collated the tour leaflets we had collected from the hostel and put an end to a frustrating and exhaustive week of research about traveling around Tasmania by booking on to two tours that go to all the places we want. We then congratulated ourselves on a job well done over hot salmon and leek pie and goats cheese and basil tartlet with coffee.

Braving the weird and wonderful weather (it is rather more '4 seasons in 5 minutes' than '4 seasons in a day' here at the moment) we then started on a walking tour of Hobart, starting with Salamanca Place; a waterside parade of sandstone Georgian warehouses converted into dainty little shops full of beautiful hand-made art and design, and curios in textiles, wraught iron, silver and wood.

Government House
After much meandering through shops, we walked back up to Hampden Road towards our bakery, taking in the ex-Italian mansion 'Lenna of Hobart' (now a hotel), Arthur Circus; a little circle of quaint Georgian houses around a small village green, some antique shops and Narryna, the Heritage Museum, where we were treated to a brief history lesson by a passing lady who explained that the sandstone was old ballast as the colonisers didn't know if there would be sandstone in Tasmania.

Beyond Hampden we walked through St David's Park, Hobart's old cemetary and now a park. The headstones were all sheared into thin plates and mounted into stone walls, and we spent some time looking at the names, one of which, 'Arabella Dager' we agreed would make a wonderful character name in a fictional book. God bless her soul.

Funny sign
Back towards Salamanca Place we walked past Parliament House, and down to Waterman's Dock, walked along Sulluvans Cove, past Elizabeth Pier and onto Constitution Dock. Here we marvelled at the gigantic cruise ship docked, and ate at the rather more modest barges selling fish and chips straight from the sea. Zoe enjoyed her Trevally which she found to be much meatier and chewier and more enjoyable to a girl that doesn't eat much fish in preference for meat. I found it too chewy but loved my Blue Grenadier which is as flaky but more flavoursome than cod at home. We sat and ate on a sunny bench over-looking the water, watching the Lady Nelson ship sway (one of the founding ships) and the reflection of water on the bows.

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Salamanca Square
Salamanca Square
Government House
Government House
Funny sign
Funny sign
Lady Nelson
Lady Nelson
Constitution Dock
Constitution Dock
Hobart
photo by: Sunflower300