Charleston, South Carolina Here We Come...Part 2

Charleston Travel Blog

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From Santee we took the Interstate 95 southbound then the Interstate 26 eastbound to Charleston.  Our first stop...Fort Sumter National Monument.  There was no entrance fee to the monument but there was a fee of $14 per person for boat transportation to the actual fort located at the entrance of Charleston Harbor.  Since our departure from time from Liberty Square was at noon, we decided to roam around downtown Charleston.

We headed south of Liberty Square  on Concord Street to Waterfront Park.  Waterfront Park, as the name suggests, lies on along Chareleston Harbor.  The park's locale is a great vantage point to view boats speeding across the harbor.  It is a lovely city park with beautiful fountains, grassy green lawns, palm-tree lined walkways, old-fashioned park benches, and pier. 

Further south of Waterfront Park is The Battery.  The Battery, also known as White Point Gardens has views of Fort Sumter and Charleston Habor.  White Point Gardens is another lovely park with a gazebo shaded by oak trees and military artifacts.  Around the Battery are beautiful homes some Greek Revival, some Victorian, while others are historical and are open to guided tours like the Edmondston-Alston House.   Unfortunately, we didn't have time to tour any of the historic homes.  We did take however take a brief stroll along the waterfront and enjoy the cooling breeze. 
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Our transportation to Fort Sumter

To get to Fort Sumter, we booked our boat ride from Liberty Square with Spiritline Cruises.  As the boat zipped across Charleston Harbor, the salty ocean air became a natural air conditioner which was a welcomed relief from the stifling southern humidity and midday sun. 

 

Fort Sumter was named after Thomas Sumter, a South Carolina patriot of the Revolutionary War.  Construction of the fort began in 1829 to fortify the US coastline after the War of 1812.  The fort rests on a man-made island, made from New England granite, at the mouth of Charleston Harbor.  The fort has five sides and was made of brick walls five feet thick with lengths ranging from 170 to 190 feet and a height of 50 feet above low tide.

  By design, Fort Sumter was able to hold 135 guns and a garrison of 650 men.  On December 26th 1860, the fort was only 90% complete when Major Robert Anderson of the “Union” forces secretly took command of Fort Sumter.  

 

Fort Sumter has the special place in American history of being the locale where the first shots of the Civil War were fired, on April 12, 1861.  

 

After departing the boat, we walked through Sally Port and through the Left-Flank Casemates.  From the casemates (gunrooms) we walked to the ruins of Men’s Barracks and the Officer’s Quarters.  A museum on the fort grounds displays Civil War relics.  Six flags fly over the fort:  U.S. flag with 50 stars, U.S. flag from 1865 with 35 stars, the South Carolina state flag, the first Confederate flag from 1861, and U.S flag from 1861 with 33 stars.  Plus there are several cannons positioned around the fort grounds. 

Our transportation to Fort Sumter
Our transportation to Fort Sumter
Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge is the l…
Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge is the …
Fort Sumter
Fort Sumter
Flags flying over Fort Sumter
Flags flying over Fort Sumter
I have a special knack for blinkin…
I have a special knack for blinki…
Another fountain at Waterfront Par…
Another fountain at Waterfront Pa…
Another fountain at Waterfront Par…
Another fountain at Waterfront Pa…
I dont mind getting my feet wet!
I don't mind getting my feet wet!
Waterwings!
Waterwings!
Charleston
photo by: denisx