I Caught a Travel Bug Here

Horlivka Travel Blog

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Traveling became my passion during my student's years in Horlivka. I was a student of the English Faculty of Horlivka State Pedagogical Institute of Foreign Languages in Soviet times. At that time nobody called the city Horlivka, everybody said in Russian: Gorlovka. 

They say that he who had studied in Horlivka for five years became a city resident. I wondered if I could call myself a local and my answer was negative. I did not visit too many places in the city to be able to have it at my fingertips. Perhaps I spent too much time doing my homework...So I had to rediscover Horlivka during my visits after my graduation: in 2002, 2009 and 2010. 

1779 is the foundation year of Horlivka. The city is called after an outstanding Russian mining engineer Peter Gorlov (1839-1915). He was commissioned for the construction of Kursk-Kharkiv-Azov railway and designed many coalmines.

Lenin Street Shopping Mall
The grateful residents of Horlivka erected a monument to Peter Gorlov in Victory Avenue in 1999. 

The city area is 422 square kilometers, which is half of the size of the Ukrainian capital Kiev. Horlivka is divided into three administrative districts: Central City District, Kalinin District and Nikitov District. The settlements of Golmovsky, Zaytsevo, Panteleymonovka and the villages of Ozerianovka and Gladossovo are incorporated into the city area. About 300,000 residents live in Horlivka now. The city has three railway stations, more than 1,500 streets, avenues, boulevards and lanes. There is a small river in the city – the River Korsun, a tributary of the River Krynka that flows into the Seversky Donets, our big river. 

Horlivka means a lot of nice memories of my youth to me. We used to study the culture of the English-speaking countries, but could not even dream of visiting them.
Victory Avenue apartment houses
We had to travel without seeing most of the time. However, we wanted to learn the habits and ways of those countries not only from textbooks, but also from TV, radio, newspapers and magazines. 

Our Communist textbooks, where every word had been approved "from above", did not satisfy our thirst for knowledge and experience, and we sought other ways of developing our skills and ideas. My friends and I enjoyed listening to the VOA ("Voice of America") "Special English" programs after we had installed an extended SW antenna into an old radio set in our room in the dormitory where we used to stay. It was very interesting and exciting to get the first-hand knowledge from native speakers over the radio, especially in the times of the information vacuum in our country. It was not very safe, though. But good luck was on our side and our passion for foreign broadcasts did not lead us into any trouble with the authorities.
Victory Avenue apartment houses
 

The videos were very rare in those days and we got the feeling of the foreign culture through music. We listened to music and learnt by heart the songs of "Queen", "ABBA", "Beatles," "Pink Floyd", "Boney-M" and others.

My fondest memories of Horlivka are:

  1. *** visiting the ponds on the western outskirts;
  2. *** walking in the city parks;
  3. *** seeing new movies at "Shakhtar" movie theater;
  4. *** attending a swimming section at the local Palace of Sports;
  5. *** listening to the VOA Special English Programs over the wireless at the dormitory;
  6. *** visiting the nearby Korolenko ponds;
  7. *** meeting with my friends there;
  8. *** working at the college library and linguistic laboratory;
  9. *** discovering the city streets;
  10. *** exploring the city ourskirts such as the Seversky Donets-Donbass canal
  11. *** shopping at the city stores;
  12. *** celebrating each other's birthdays.
    Coalmining administration, Lenin Street
    ..

I am very thankful to my alma mater for education, practice and experience. In 1981, my fellow student Oleg and I were selected for a study trip to "friendly Germany", the GDR, or East Germany, what is now "the new provinces". We had a month-long intensive German course at Erich Weinert Pedagogical College Magdeburg (PHM) in Magdeburg (now it is a part of Otto von Guericke University). It was a great experience for me, of course. I was privileged to visit Berlin, Magdeburg and many other big and small towns and cities during the weekends.

During my last year of studies, my college recommended me for a business trip abroad as an interpreter. Such testimonials were issued every year to several gifted students, but only some of them were selected for a business trip in the long run. Thanks a lot, my college, for that testimonial! A business trip abroad was a huge award in those times, especially if you take into account that a person like myself did not belong to the ruling Communist party.

Komsomol Street apartment houses
Thank Goodness nobody realized then that I had no intention of joining it whatsoever! In those Communist times you only had to study well, to attend all the general meetings of the Young Communist League (YCL) of your school or college, and to raise your hand to vote for this or that resolution. You did not even have to follow the agenda of the meeting, you only had to sit and behave, and nobody really cared if you had any genuine respect for the Communist ideals and leaders. 

Luckily, while I was  a fifth-year student, I was selected as a candidate for a possible business trip abroad as an interpreter. The college recommendation worked, and in August of the same year I found myself invited to the "friendly Iraq" as an interpreter at a Soviet-built cement plant in the city of Samawa located in the south of Iraq. I spent there one year translating for a technical assistance group from the Soviet Union.

Victory Square
Thanks, my good college, for recommending me for that honorable – and cool – job abroad! You see, there was a custom in the Soviet Union to build factories and plants for developing countries that were regarded by the USSR as friendly nations and potential socialist countries. Our technical assistance group in Samawa, Iraq, worked at the Portland cement plant built by the Soviet Union in the seventies. The city of Samawa itself is located 270 km to the south of Baghdad. Working at the Soviet-built cement plant was a very serious job and a good way of practicing my knowledge. Besides, it was a good financial start in my career. I think I did my best and managed my everyday duties as an interpreter in that faraway mysterious country. 

In May 2009, I attended the jubilee reunion of the graduates of our college dedicated to the 60th anniversary of Horlivka State Pedagogical Institute of Foreign Languages.
A lot of private houses
It was a must for me, and an opportunity to meet with my former fellow students, to visit the old and new places there and to take tons of pictures.  During our Reunion on May 31, 2009 the Association of the College Graduates of Horlivka State Pedagogical Institute of Foreign Languages was founded.
Now I am its member among hundreds of other former students. In July 2010, I  revisited Horlivka to meet my old friend and former roomate Vladimir who lived in Russia by that time. It was a great reunion!

To see the main sites and to feel the busy city atmosphere, I would suggest that you drive along the main city streets according to the following route (you can make as many stops as yopu wish just top take pictures or to relax: Starting point:  the monument to Nikita Izotov, Lenin Avenue >>> turn left to Besposhchadny Street (Jubilee Park, ponds and Volcano nightclub) >>>  Minin and Pozharsky Street  (Gostiny Dvor – Inn – hotel + restaurant)  >>> turn left to  Komsomol Street (past Power Specialists Park and Victory Square) >>> turn left to  Rudakov Street (past Heroes Park) >>> turn left to Herzen Street >>> turn right to   Victory Avenue (Bavaria Restaurant) >>> turn right to  Gagarin Street >>> turn left to  Pushkin Street (arts museum and city history museum) >>> and proceed to Soviet Army Park and the bus terminal.

City outskirts

Studying the city map, I noticed that Horlivka streets sometimes sounded very unique. What do you think of such street names:

  1. Merry Street (in Ozeryanovka)
  2. Galileo Street (in Gagarin Settlement)
  3. Democratic Street  (in Block 88)
  4. Long Lane  (in Alexeyevka)
  5. Pearl Street  (in Coalmine 6-7 settlement)
  6. Picturesque Street  (in Nikotov District)
  7. Cultural Street  (in Alexeyevka)
  8. Moon Street  (in Kondratyev Settlement)
  9. Olympic Street  (in Kirov Settlement)
  10. Christmas Street  (in Kalinin Settlement)
  11. Amber Street  (in Komarov Settlement)
  12. Clean Lane  (in Komarov Settlement)
  13. Cold Street  (in Komarov Settlement)
  14. Narrow Lane  (in Alexeyevka Settlement).

As you see, streets in Alexeyevka and Komarov Settlement are champions in beautiful street names.

Shakhtar Movie Theater
These are the street names I have never come across in any city I have visited. However, I do not think the streets look as poetic, attractive and beautiful as their names sound. I am sure that just a picture at the background of a street name plaque would be a fun to have at home. It would be great for any local like me, to say nothing of foreigners. In fact, it is one of my further plans about traveling to Horlivka: to visit some of those streets and to take pictures there.

There are fifty-two bus routes about the city and its environs. These routes are operated by about four hundred buses all in all every day. 

These are city bus routes for you, fellow travelers, just in case.

1 – Nikitovka Station – Knitted-goods factory

2 – Grechnev Street – Construction Workers Block

3 – Ring route

4 – Volkov Street – Komarov Settlement

5 – Herzen Street – Settlement of Kondratievka

6 - Knitted-goods factory – October Settlement

7 – 40 Years of Ukraine Street - Nikitovka Station

10 – Herzen Street – Lenin Coalmine Settlement

11 – Bus terminal – Kochegarka Coalmine Settlement

12 – Kalinin Coalmine – Settlement of Bayrak

13 – Chemical factory - Komarov Settlement

14 - Nikitovka Station - Bessarabka

15 – Bus termina – Red Partisan Settlement

16 – Volkov Street – 40 Years of Ukraine Street

17 – Railway Station – Peace Street

18 - Bus terminal – Wide Ravine

19 – 88 Block – Sunny Block

20 – Volkov Street - Construction Workers Block

21 – Bus terminal – 88th Block

22 – Volkov Street – Chemical factory

23 – Grechnev Street – Service station

24 – Chemical factory – 245th Block

25 – Bus terminal - Komarov Settlement

27 – 40 Years of Ukraine Street – Bus terminal

28 - Komarov Settlement – Settlement of Kuznetsovka

28A - Komarov Settlement – Koksan Company

29A -  Ring route

29B – Ring route

30 – Herzen Street - Village of Vorobyovka

31 – 88th Block – Nikitovka Station

32 – Herzen Street – Mirnoye Settlement

33 – Herzen Strteet - Autostore

35 – Ring route

36 – 88th Block – Chemical factory

38 – Village of Vorobyovka – Nikitovka Station

77 – Bus terminal - Panteleymonovka

81 – Nikitovka Station – Settlement of Golmovsky

82 - Nikitovka Station – Settlement of Zaytsevo

83 - Nikitovka Station – Settlement of Bakhmutka

83A – Volkov Street – Settlement of Nokolayevka

100 –Komarov Settlement - Nikitovka Station

101 – Zhukov Street – Kalinin Coalmine

102 – 88 Block – 40 Years of Ukraine Street

104 – Kondratyevka – 245th Block

106 – 88 Block – 245th Block

107 – Gagarin Coalmine Settlement – Ksenevka Settlement

In addition, here are some nice links for you:

  1. http://ukrainetrek.
    City entry roadside marker
    com/gorlovka-ukraine-city.shtml
      :  A nice city overview;
  2. http://www.answers.com/topic/horlivka : More Info on Horlivka;
  3. http://prosto-gorlovka.at.ua/ : Simply Gorlovka;
  4. http://prosto-gorlovka.at.ua/photo/ : Pictures of Horlivka;
  5. http://donhell.at.ua/photo/1-0-14 : Chemical factory pictures;
  6. http://gorlovka.dn.ua/ : News web site of Horlivka;
  7. http://rockingorlovka.at.ua/ : For music lovers.
planxty says:
Hello again, mate.

Very well done on the featured review, it is well deserved for what is a very interesting read.
Posted on: May 03, 2017
vicIII says:
Thanks, I have only shared my memories and some of my knowledge for you, fellow travellers!:)
Posted on: May 03, 2017
X_Drive says:
Congrats on your featured blog! :D
Posted on: May 02, 2017
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Lenin Street Shopping Mall
Lenin Street Shopping Mall
Victory Avenue apartment houses
Victory Avenue apartment houses
Victory Avenue apartment houses
Victory Avenue apartment houses
Coalmining administration, Lenin S…
Coalmining administration, Lenin …
Komsomol Street apartment houses
Komsomol Street apartment houses
Victory Square
Victory Square
A lot of private houses
A lot of private houses
City outskirts
City outskirts
Shakhtar Movie Theater
Shakhtar Movie Theater
City entry roadside marker
City entry roadside marker
The city council building
The city council building
Stalin era apartment houses
Stalin era apartment houses
My Soviet times postcard of Horliv…
My Soviet times postcard of Horli…
My Soviet times postcard of Horliv…
My Soviet times postcard of Horli…
My Soviet times postcard of Horliv…
My Soviet times postcard of Horli…
My Soviet times postcard of Horliv…
My Soviet times postcard of Horli…
My Soviet times postcard of Horliv…
My Soviet times postcard of Horli…
My Soviet times postcard of Horliv…
My Soviet times postcard of Horli…
My Soviet times postcard of Horliv…
My Soviet times postcard of Horli…
My Soviet times postcard of Horliv…
My Soviet times postcard of Horli…
My Soviet times postcard of Horliv…
My Soviet times postcard of Horli…
The Canal
The Canal
Our favourite means of transportat…
Our favourite means of transporta…
Archangel St.Michael and the coalm…
Archangel St.Michael and the coal…
Old badges dedicated to Horlivka
Old badges dedicated to Horlivka
Horlivka
photo by: vicIII