Horses, Hot Springs, and Hiking

Yellowstone National Park Travel Blog

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The elk in the historic area of Mammoth

We started the morning with breakfast between the grill and the convenience store before going on a self-guided tour of the historic part of Mammoth.  We walked past buildings that once served the US Army when they were in charge of protecting the park at the beginning of the 20th century.  Today some of the stone buildings house civilian instead of military families including that of the park supervisor.

After this walk we went for the short drive needed to reach the horse corrals.  Later, the weather would cause the rides to be cancelled but ours was completed under nearly clear blue skies.  We sat through the safety session and then headed into the corral where the stablehands led a horse over to each of us.  My horse was a half-Belgian, half-Welsh pony named Bashful.  I was actually the first person helped up onto their horse although I was able to get in the saddle easily.  The wait for everyone else to saddle up wasn’t too long and then we set off on our hour-long ride.

  Overall, it was a very enjoyable experience; we rode through open meadow and pine-shadowed areas.  We saw a sole elk on the way out; on the way back in we discovered the rest of the herd.

We finished touring Mammoth Hot Springs next; we had missed the portion that links the Lower and Upper Terraces in our earlier ventures.  Canary Spring and Jupiter Terrace are actually two of the most active features at the Hot Springs right now.  Very fascinating.

We spent the afternoon at another thermal area: Norris Geyser Basin.  Emerald Spring is one of the more beautiful features here.  The Porcelain Basin offers a view once described to us by a joking tour bus driver as “where they filmed The Search for Spock.”  Interestingly, the boardwalks we traversed while visiting in 1995 have had to be moved due to a change in thermal activity.

We had dinner at Canyon and then headed to the South Rim for a good view of the Upper Falls and then after a hike down Uncle Tom’s Trail (over 325 steps), a fantastic view of the Lower Falls.

Another rain storm chased us back to the car; however, it was short-lived enough for us to see mule deer and elk on the drive back to Mammoth.

vulindlela says:
Wow, awesome photos!
Posted on: Jan 17, 2010
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The elk in the historic area of Ma…
The elk in the historic area of M…
Roaring Mountain
Roaring Mountain
at the Porcelain Basin
at the Porcelain Basin
pinecone in front of Congress Pool
pinecone in front of Congress Pool
Congress Pool
Congress Pool
Porcelain Basin
Porcelain Basin
Upper Falls in the canyon
Upper Falls in the canyon
Lower Falls in the canyon from the…
Lower Falls in the canyon from th…
the crows are huge out here compar…
the crows are huge out here compa…
Mule deer
Mule deer
Elk
Elk