Extensive Farming Country

Saint-Thuribe Travel Blog

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A view in the centre of the village
St-Thuribe is situated just at the footstep of the Laurentian Piedmont and on the opening of the 'Great Western Plain'. Purely farmland sole purpose, this settlement is pretty tiny and as main element, it is situated out of any major road which did always bring me the wonder of only seeing the direction sign but made me wonder long if it really existed! Well it does exists!

The village with its sole church and few houses is built on top of a local Moraine, this type of soil being less proper to farming, while the surrounding consists of a vast openfield farmland. For that very reason, the settlement can be seen from very far while you drive the country road. This give a nice local landmark to the region.

Other specific landscape elements are mainly the results of the local rivers enbankment into the clay soil, which causes deep tiny valley meandering around.
Ice Age remains.. a morraine
The local geomorphology is of prime interest, but what about it?
Only less than 10 000 years this whole plain was a few hundred meters beneath the Sea which was called the Champlain Sea an remained as such until the last glacier withdrew from the region and allowed the water to flow towards the ocean... the water retreat happened only 7000 years ago. The clay deposit accumulated at the bottom of that sea fertilising this land and making it a soil proper to farming which became of course the main purpose of the local economy.

The sea did rise to a level of 150m of the actual St-Lawrence River, making the location of villages like Lac-Sergent and St-Leonard being coastal. Although this coast was mainly covered with a thick Ice Cap 'sleeping' and ravaging the top of the Laurentian mountains (giving them their smooth roundy shape that you can see in today's landscape).
Overview on the farming village
The Moraine in which St-Thuribe's village is built on is the famously St-Narcisse Moraine which extends for hundred of km on the north shore of the St-Lawrence. It marks the latest extent and point of retreat of the latest glaciation ... creating a slight 'bump' of stony sand making a long 'snake alike' line on the flat landscape.

Due to the fact that the Champlain Sea did retreat gradually to the level of the actual St-Lawrence river (and the actual Canadian Great Lakes being the contemporary remains of that sea), its retreat created a series of 'land terrace' giving the impression that you step by step move down (or up towards the Laurentians) from the Laurentians to the St-Lawrence River.

Well hope that educative intermezzo didn't bother you too deeply, but I did graduate in Geography-Geomorphology, so that region did become a large study case.
Church - St-Thuribe ((c)MRC de Portneuf)


Our next destination reaches back towards the Ste-Anne river Valley, a large and major river crossing the county, and the same river where St-Raymond's settlement is built more upstream.
First Ste-Christine, a tiny settlement lost in the middle point of the county and followed by St-Alban. From then on, we will learn that the Clay soil might reveal great for farming, but can be tragic for housing.
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A view in the centre of the village
A view in the centre of the village
Ice Age remains.. a morraine
Ice Age remains.. a morraine
Overview on the farming village
Overview on the farming village
Church - St-Thuribe  ((c)MRC de Po…
Church - St-Thuribe ((c)MRC de P…
Saint-Thuribe
photo by: maplefanta