Dublin Part 1

Dublin Travel Blog

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The Spire on O'Connell Street
I arrived in the Dublin airport Sunday morning and took the 16A bus from one end of the City to the other. The trip took a little over an hour, which was very nerve wracking because as I had no idea where I was going. Dublin is a much smaller capital city than those I had previously visited in Europe and has a distinct style of its own.

Lucia met me at the second bus stop after the Yellow House Pub and we walked to her apartment in a residential development surrounding Loreto Abbey. The development features ponds, fountains, underground parking, and a child care center, all built around a monastery from back in the day.

Lucia worked everyday and went to school on Monday and Wednesday nights until late so, I was mostly on my own.
The happening street on the North side
And I primarily spent everyday going to the city center and walking around. I started in the North, getting off the bus at O’Connell Street, next to the Spire, which the City built to commemorate the year 2000. I arrived there just as school was getting out, so there were a lot of kids running around with the plaid uniforms on and as far as I could tell all of the students wear uniforms through high school. But I did not stay there too long, as there is not as much activity there.

Older buildings line the river and continue for a few blocks back until the new shopping centers take over. There are less shops and restaurants and more offices, transit hubs, and corporate buildings. Atypically, the North in Dublin is the poor, less desirable area, while the South is wealthier and the place to be.
Pedestrian shopping walk in the North side
This is because the south was the first area to be developed, so the everything stems from there.

This is very apparent when entering the southern bank. The buildings are characterized by Georgian, gothic, and medieval buildings. Some of the most famous buildings are Dublin Castle, Saint Andrew’s Church, and those of Temple Bar. Temple Bar is the oldest part with narrow stone streets, 2 to 5 story buildings and is now where one finds the most famous pubs, music venues, and anything typically Irish.

The architecture typically found in Dublin is called Georgian and most famous are the doorways, which I did not take any pictures of, but there are a lot of pictures on line if you look up “doors of Dublin.” The city center featured many of my favorite pedestrian only streets in both the North and the South, the most famous is Grafton Street which terminates at the central park of Dublin, called Saint Stephens Green.
The Dividing River
Grafton Street is now dominated by multinational outfits, so unless you want designer clothes that you can get in any major city there is nothing more to do there except walk through and gaze. Fortunately though there are quite a few pedestrian only streets with other options, and many others with local businesses.

The food was the most expensive I have had in all of Europe, which is the result of high rent. During the brain drain of the 80s and 90s the economy suffered significantly. This, however, also made the City attractive to multinational companies looking for a cheap place to locate. And with that came brains from all over Europe, the Middle East, and a few from Africa. With this new multinational influx of minds and money, the cost of living significantly increased.
3 floor balcony is the place I stayed
I paid 13 euros for a burrito that was smaller than my hand, not to mention that it was not appetizing at all.

I never really stayed out to late, as the only public transportation was the city bus, which did not have night trips to the area near Loreto Abbey, and a 30 minute cab ride can be very expensive. But a couple of nights Lucia and I met for dinner before heading back. One night we attempted some salsa, but that did not go over as well as we had hoped. I was happy to relax at the apartment and watch movies until the wee hours of the morning before going to bed and doing it all over again.

Some other interesting sights in the city center are Temple College, the most famous in Ireland, Marion Square, and the original Saint Patrick’s Church.

I look a day trip on bus 42 to Malahide Castle about 13 km outside of the city center.
Underground Parking at the spot
The castle was the home of the Tudor family and underwent numerous interior renovations on the inside. The castle was typical of medieval times, with thick walls, up to 8 feet, and small windows to protect them attacks. The grounds were large, green, and well manicured. Now, the area also features sports fields for general leagues.

On Saturday, Lucia and I went took the bus and the DART train to the sea at Black Rock. We walked around the Village and ate some lunch. The train separates Black Rock from the sea, but we were able to cross the tracks and walk along the rocky shore. The shore featured steps to the water, most likely for boating activities. I stepped down and was finally able to put my feet in the water. That was about all because it was cold outside, the water itself was cold, and I had long pants on. The water was surprisingly clear for a harbor exiting the capital city. Before returning to the chaos of Dublin we relaxed on the edge and looked out to the islands in the sea, towns further down the harbor, and the infrastructure of Dublin to the left.
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The Spire on OConnell Street
The Spire on O'Connell Street
The happening street on the North …
The happening street on the North…
Pedestrian shopping walk in the No…
Pedestrian shopping walk in the N…
The Dividing River
The Dividing River
3 floor balcony is the place I sta…
3 floor balcony is the place I st…
Underground Parking at the spot
Underground Parking at the spot
The pond outside the building
The pond outside the building
part of Loreto Abbey
part of Loreto Abbey
St. Stephens Green
St. Stephen's Green
Looking up Garrod Street
Looking up Garrod Street
Side street of of Garrod
Side street of of Garrod
View down Garrod Street
View down Garrod Street
St. George Street Market building
St. George Street Market building
Temple Bar at Temple Bar
Temple Bar at Temple Bar
Dublin Castle
Dublin Castle
St. Marion Square
St. Marion Square
St. Marion Square
St. Marion Square
Georgian architecture in fron ot S…
Georgian architecture in fron ot …
Trinity College
Trinity College
St. Patricks Church
St. Patrick's Church
Dublin
photo by: fransglobal