Malaysia

Malacca Travel Blog

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The guesthouse in Malaka - the best yet.

We are coming to the end of our trip in Malaysia and reflecting on a country that was not part of our original itinery, but almost an afterthought.  However, we have enjoyed Malaysia as much as the other Asian countries we have travelled in, despite and probably because, it is so different.

There is a fascinating mix of people - Malays, Chinese, Indians, Sri Lankans, and consequently a varied skyline of mosques and Hindu and Buddhist temples.  Monks in burnt orange robes mingle with men in prayer caps and Sikh turbans.  Somehow, they are preserving their cultures and traditions despite massive modernisation along western lines.  People here are far more affluent than elsewhere in SE Asia, and westerners are not seen as just endless pots of money.

Our local!
  In Melaka there are hundreds of Asian tourists from Malaysia, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Singapore who are probably wealthier than us!  So the Malaysians have a different mindset towards tourists and enjoy their role as hosts.  This year is an important one, as it is the 50th anniversary of Malaysian independence (the British handed back power in 1957) and there are "Visit Malaysia 2007" stickers wherever you go.  Throughout our visit, people in shops and on the street have greeted us with "Welcome to Malaysia,"  smiled at us and generally been very friendly and helpful.

The government has set an ambitious target for Malaysia to become a first world nation by 2020 - this means doubling the size of the economy and increasing personal income four-fold.  One of the more ambitious projects involves building a hi-tech "multi-media super corridor" stretching 50km south from KL, including a new, supposedly paperless administrative city called Putrajaya - much of this is already in place.  As a visitor, you can't help but feel that Malaysia is on the up and up.

It is also very refreshing to see Malaysian muslim women taking a prominent and visible role in society.  We have seen muslim women in the police force, as security guards, office workers, and in commerce and business.  This is really positive, as all too often muslim women's human rights are non-existent, justified by religion.

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The guesthouse in Malaka - the bes…
The guesthouse in Malaka - the be…
Our local!
Our local!
Some more views of China Town
Some more views of China Town
Emma at church
Emma at church
A windmill? In Malaysia?
A windmill? In Malaysia?
Malacca
photo by: louise2553