#1 8-16-2017 3:48 AM

ilikeitlikethat
Bobby
Soho London, United Kingdom
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Tourist
Posts: 186

The Investments of a Tourist

As tourists, we choose where we spend our holiday/vacation money.
We ask nothing more than a good time full of memories and mementos.

Your tourism offers a boost of revenue which is quick cash to local economies.

I'm thinking of going to Lane County in Oregon for a week, and maybe even shopping up north in Portland metro area for something I want if I don't find it in Eugene (a nice guitar)..

I'm thinking... They've got freedom, they'e got human rights, I'm thinking, why not?
It's better than some nice beach somewhere where the freedoms are little for the locals and authorities accept bribes. - If I ever go to such a place, it wouldn't be as a tourist I could tell you that much, that would be a business trip, but as a tourist, I like to know there's no b/s going on behind the resort, y'know?

Has anyone ever thought about what visiting a foreign country and stopped to think about how they as a tourist could have a good time and support the local culture?

Where would you like to go? What's out there to see? Some islands in Fiji require gifts and tribal elders, that could be fun if you like camping. Your good times are yours, and the locals are people too doing their job too. While you vacate, they work too.
So where do you want to invest your currency?

Last edited by ilikeitlikethat (8-16-2017 3:56 AM)

 

#2 8-16-2017 6:19 AM

sarahelaine
Sarah Elaine
Manchester, England
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Re: The Investments of a Tourist

A major part of the British economy is the arms trade, and we were also world leaders in oil (see the BP atrocities in Nigeria) and Tobacco, not to mention the slave trade back in the day. I hesitate to take too much moral high ground.

I don't think boycotts work often- even the major apartheid boycott of South Africa took decades to have any effect and arguably didn't work as well as direct pressure and negotiation anyway. I think the lever of aid and tourist foreign exchange money is more effective at a governmental level, but still extremely limited. I think dialogue works. Talking to people, being a decent informal ambassador for your country, and a gradual thawing out of relations.

So I have spent long stays in countries where I disapprove of aspects of their government policy. I have shopped wherever possible in smaller, locally owned businesses, but I try to do that at home. When issues like gay rights have come up in conversation with locals, I have answered as calmly and honestly as I can, without seeking to convert, and been surprised how often the real people on the ground agree with me. I've looked to learn and to understand, not to shutter out too much of the world, even where I cannot condone.

There's simply too much of the world which I would have to avoid if I took too much of a preachy standpoint. And that includes some of the major democratic nations. It would be hypocritical of me to boycott the ones I knew about and visit the ones whose underhanded deals and harm are quietly in Swiss bank accounts. But I can spend my money with the tailor in the marketplace rather than the sweatshop supermarket store.

 

#3 8-16-2017 11:25 AM

ilikeitlikethat
Bobby
Soho London, United Kingdom
Award: Vox Populi I
Tourist
Posts: 186

Re: The Investments of a Tourist

IDK, Police in Sri Lanka take bribes, let them, but why I should I go then?
Some beach, some natural beauty?

Last edited by ilikeitlikethat (8-16-2017 11:27 AM)

 

#4 8-16-2017 11:26 AM

ilikeitlikethat
Bobby
Soho London, United Kingdom
Award: Vox Populi I
Tourist
Posts: 186

Re: The Investments of a Tourist

If police take bribes, what is that telling me?

It's telling me they don't care about me or the locals, but money.
Why would I want to go somewhere like that?

Last edited by ilikeitlikethat (8-16-2017 11:27 AM)

 

#5 8-16-2017 11:32 AM

ilikeitlikethat
Bobby
Soho London, United Kingdom
Award: Vox Populi I
Tourist
Posts: 186

Re: The Investments of a Tourist

Somewhere like Lane County in Oregon which has lost out to the loss of timber and logging who have chosen to invest in town planning with public transport and expansion of the airport, who want this income, why should they lose out while some cultures with sweatshops and arranged marriages and no human rights or freedoms gets to call it's self a popular tourist destination?

It's my money, why shouldn't I be judgemental where I spend my down time?

 

#6 8-16-2017 11:34 AM

ilikeitlikethat
Bobby
Soho London, United Kingdom
Award: Vox Populi I
Tourist
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Re: The Investments of a Tourist

I don't want for much, but not being walled off from impoverished masses while I spend my money at the bar or by the pool or on the hotel is one of my needs and wants.

Why should it be Hell outside of a resort populated with tourists from back home?
Why should I ever be afraid to venture out on my down time in another part of the world and fear locals and police?

Last edited by ilikeitlikethat (8-16-2017 11:37 AM)

 

#7 8-16-2017 11:40 AM

ilikeitlikethat
Bobby
Soho London, United Kingdom
Award: Vox Populi I
Tourist
Posts: 186

Re: The Investments of a Tourist

At the end of the day, our tourist money helps support where we choose to go and is like quick cash to where we visit.
The only dividends we should seek for our time off is fond memories and mementos.

 

#8 8-16-2017 1:59 PM

sarahelaine
Sarah Elaine
Manchester, England
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Globetrotter
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Re: The Investments of a Tourist

I know absolutely nothing about Sri Lanka. I do know that the USA is a beautiful nation, full of wonderful people, whose current president wants to ban significant numbers of my friends from visiting on the grounds of their religion and who has just openly supported neo nazis. Now it would be spectacularly unfair of me to judge the millions and millions of Americans in the world by his standards. I know uganda's regressive policy on LGBT rights was heavily influenced by American evangelicals, having previously been more laissez faire- but ultimately the laws were based on the laws the uk had when we saw fit to conquer half the bloody world. I also know there are warm people, recovering from a vicious civil war, doing incredible health and conservation work with precious little help from outside, and achieving daily miracles. Sitting in London sneering does nothing to help them- spending a bit of precious forex with them brings in more medicines and equipment for the wildlife camps. So just as I will not sit in judgment over millions of Americans because their president has developed an irrational hatred of millions of innocent Muslims and Mexicans, I won't sit in judgment either (for the record paying your legitimate speeding fine in Uganda is a bloody nightmare because to prevent people taking bribes you have to show up in person at a specific bank, pay it, get it certified and then present yourself in person at a police station to certify you paid).

No, I can't say sitting in a walled resort appeals much to me either. I've never done it. The nations I've stayed in have not been active war zones and I've never been anywhere I've been afraid of the police. I mean traffic stops in some countries look a bit hairy, especially those nations where they are heavily armed because British traffic police have a small stick. But I've never felt threatened. And I have very warm memories of the people everywhere I've gone, even in those nations where my politics are wildly different from the government of that nation.

No nation is perfect, and you're right to say each of us should be making careful moral decisions where we spend it. But those decisions differ person to person- there was a really interesting thread on it a while back, I'll see if I can dig it out for you- and I'm not sure any nation is enough of a goody to hold the high ground.

 

#9 8-16-2017 2:02 PM

sarahelaine
Sarah Elaine
Manchester, England
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Globetrotter
Posts: 5998

Re: The Investments of a Tourist

Here we go- previous topic on this sort of subject. Lots of interesting views on both sides. http://www.travbuddy.com/forums/viewtopic.php?id=66649

 

#10 8-19-2017 1:27 AM

pfsmalo
Paul
Saint Malo, France
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Re: The Investments of a Tourist

sarahelaine wrote:

A major part of the British economy is the arms trade, and we were also world leaders in oil (see the BP atrocities in Nigeria) and Tobacco, not to mention the slave trade back in the day. I hesitate to take too much moral high ground.

I don't think boycotts work often- even the major apartheid boycott of South Africa took decades to have any effect and arguably didn't work as well as direct pressure and negotiation anyway. I think the lever of aid and tourist foreign exchange money is more effective at a governmental level, but still extremely limited. I think dialogue works. Talking to people, being a decent informal ambassador for your country, and a gradual thawing out of relations.

So I have spent long stays in countries where I disapprove of aspects of their government policy. I have shopped wherever possible in smaller, locally owned businesses, but I try to do that at home. When issues like gay rights have come up in conversation with locals, I have answered as calmly and honestly as I can, without seeking to convert, and been surprised how often the real people on the ground agree with me. I've looked to learn and to understand, not to shutter out too much of the world, even where I cannot condone.

There's simply too much of the world which I would have to avoid if I took too much of a preachy standpoint. And that includes some of the major democratic nations. It would be hypocritical of me to boycott the ones I knew about and visit the ones whose underhanded deals and harm are quietly in Swiss bank accounts. But I can spend my money with the tailor in the marketplace rather than the sweatshop supermarket store.

What do you call the "BP atrocities in Nigeria", Sarahelaine ?

 

#11 8-19-2017 2:52 AM

sarahelaine
Sarah Elaine
Manchester, England
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Globetrotter
Posts: 5998

Re: The Investments of a Tourist

BP, which is no longer officially British but used to be, along with Exxon, which is American, and Shell, which used to be Dutch but again is now multinational, are responsible for several thousand oil spills in Nigeria, none adequately cleaned up. In environmental terms that's disastrous, poisoning land and fish. So no massacres (that I'm aware of), but massive problems with health and lost agricultural productivity.

Dad worked for an oil inspection firm and was often in Nigeria. On his death, we got some charming cards from local oil executives saying how refreshing it had been working with a man who would neither take nor offer bribes. We just can't pretend Brits/people from democracies are clean and above board and people from other, less regulated nations are not.

 
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