#26 2-13-2014 12:09 PM

guybooth
Lagos, Nigeria
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

niradcan wrote:

Again I will show more bias.  Sony is not in the same league as Canon, Nikon, or even Pentax for cameras.

Ha, yeah, I think you are a bit bias! No office intended, but many people get stuck on the 'Nikon' and 'Cannon' brand names and don't bother to investigate the actual specifications of various cameras.
Sure Canon and Nikon have been historically superior to Sony in Cameras,  but who cares about history when buying a camera today? It's what they are offering me now that counts. 

Technology is a changing field, and as is stands (though of course it will change) Sony is in a higher league when it comes to mirrorless.  No other manufacture apart from Sony is making full frame sensor mirrorelss cameras.
Canon and Nikon have much catching up to do - and I'm sure they will, but it's not going to be easy for Nikon as they have boxed themselves into a corner with their camera formats.
As the article I previously linked says: "the Nikon 1 (mirrorless) cameras simply cannot compete with APS-C  (used by Sony) in image quality, bokeh and dynamic range...Simply put, Nikon has a sensor size disadvantage....to be able to compete with the current APS-C mirrorless market, Nikon needs to create a new mount with a shorter flange distance. This will obviously be very expensive for the company and will take a while to catch up with good lenses."
Read more: http://photographylife.com/mirrorless-v … z2tEseeCZP

Nikon makes better DSLRs than Sony, for Sony now doesn't even make them at all! Sony has recognized the end of DSLRs and consequently Sony has been far more progressive and innovative than Nikon and Cannon, who have taken the conservative route of relaying on tried and tested old technology, and a strong brand name - though that's now left them behind in Sony's dust!
(I bet Sony has also had an advantage with their expertise in electronics gathered in all sorts of applications apart from cameras. Canon and Nikon don't make laptops and x-boxes, and simply don't do the research into computing that Sony does -and lets face it, as soon as light hits a digital cameras sensor, the camera is functioning as a computer.)

I don't get what you mean by mirror less processor speeds been slower: comparing a similar priced Nikon DSLR with a Sony Mirrorless:
Nikon 800D: at 1920 x 1080 = 30 fps
Sony a7:      at 1920 x 1080 = 60 fps
How much faster than 60 frames a second does anyone require? That's lighting fast to me. Incredible actually!

And it's also not really accurate to say mirrorless don't read light as well: it depends on the circumstance.
DSLRs use phase detection of light waves, Mirrorless systems use Contrast measurement.
The mirrorless system is not quite as good in poor light simply because there is less contrast, otherwise, it's actually a more accurate system than the DSLR phase detection.
Which is best? The faster DSLR system, or the more accurate Mirrorless system? And will you even notice the difference?
Is light measurement speed in poor light critical to you - or do you have 1/100th of a second to spare? Probably not if shooting F1 cars by moonlight - but if shooting landscapes, it doesn't matter a damn...Would you rather the greater accuracy of the mirrorless in all other circumstances? Again, probably not as who really cares if the photo 'should' be shot with an ISO of 100, or 99. 
Unless you use your camera for something very specific, you will be hard pressed to even notice the difference between using the Contrast system and the Phase system.

For me, the slower mirrorless light reading speed in dim conditions is simply theoretical - in real life I have not yet found it to be a practical limitation of my camera - but I don't shoot F1 cars by moonlight. If you do, then it would be a limitation - otherwise, the Low Light DoX Mark of the average DSLR is ISO 1385-- meaning the image quality is still regarded as great up to using an ISO of 1385.
The DxO mark of the Sony a7R is ISO 2753....in other words, the mirrorless Sony can potenally produce better quality shots in poor light, compared to the average DSLR, by a whooping factor of 65%. That really blows the myth of mirrorless cameras being inherently substandard in image quality in poor light out the window. 

Sorry to ramble on about it, but taking photos is a big part of the travel experience for many people, and it's best to make an informed choice when choosing a camera. I just don't see any good arguments for purchasing a DSLR as a travel camera these days...a camera is a tool, and it's also a compromised one - designed for a wide array of applications and circumstances.  If you have a very specific need for a camera then it may be different, but for general travel usage, mirrorless cameras are as good in image quality as DSLRs, with the advantage of being much lighter.

At the end of the day, you won't be able to tell if someones photos were taken with a DSLR, or a with a Mirrorless, but they will be able to tell you which camera was a lot less hassle to carry about.... And as an added bonus, Mirrorless are cheaper for the same image quality, simply because they cost less to manufacture than DSLRs.

Last edited by guybooth (2-13-2014 3:49 PM)

 

#27 2-14-2014 6:05 PM

Lupobianco
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

Hey Guy, really informative stuff.    You could, of course, just  point people to the results (which I assume were taken with your Sony):


http://www.travbuddy.com/travel-blogs/110959/

A picture really does say a thousand words in this case.   Some of these shots are National Geographic quality!

 

#28 2-15-2014 8:24 AM

guybooth
Lagos, Nigeria
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

Thanks Andy! Glad you found that informant - I went into a bit when I decided to spend a whack of money on camera...those Iceland shots were taken with my Sony NEX 7. Not really NatGeo standard, but i'm improving--and it's not the camera that is limiting me, but my own abilities.
The recently released Sony a7r is much better camera than the NEX 7 that I have, but I doubt I'd get any better pictures with the a7r at this stage anyhow. 
The Iceland pictures that I posted are 20% of original size (a couple of them loaded a bit different on this web sight for some reason too)  I can't tell any difference between the 100% and 20% version when looking at them on my computer screen - unless I really zoom in. Point is, unless you want to blow pictures up to poster size, there comes a point where a 'better' camera won't necessarly even produce better results. Horses for courses....

 

#29 2-16-2014 6:01 AM

karen618
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

I am using Sony RX100, no complain though I have Canon 6D.   Carried both when travelling.

 

#30 2-16-2014 1:17 PM

guybooth
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

haluzman wrote:

I still have one, but I'm getting to the point asking myself more often, "Why should I bother and have one at all?" I should rather enjoy every moment of my life and vacation without constantly trying to archive something

That's a good point, though I agree on one hand, and not on another!
Photograph can either distract you from the moment and the environment - or it can make you engage in it. Just snapping away at everything without too much thought because you want to post it on your FB time line as quick as you can to show where you happen to be, I think does the former--but taking your time with a photo can do the latter.
If you take your time climbing to different vantage points, and looking for different angels, and patiently waiting until the clouds or sun or shadows or animals or people move into a more agreeable position, and note how the colors and mood of a place change though the day,  then that forces you to engage in the environment. For me that's the fun of it. For me, trying to set up a nice shot is not so much about archiving, but about participating in my surrounds and being involved and observant. You can also think about what feeling a place gives to you, and try to capture that with different camera setting and lenses--is the waterfall enchanted and calming - or powerful and angry? Just sticking your camera in front of your face and going click is a different thing altogether compared to seeking something unique, ugly or beautiful in an specific location.
And even if you fail to find anything in that vein, at least you have looked!
A camera can either force you to look, or it can be a substitute for looking. "I'll take a quick snap shot and drive on--that's enough to tag myself on FB as having made it here." That to me is using a camera as a substitute for looking and detaches you from the location.
When taking my time with photos and trying this and that, and endeavoring to inch closer to an animal, I forget everything else exempt for the present moment and the immediate scene. Few people are going to see my pictures, and I don't look at them that often--but I don't care--the fun is in taking the photos--in using photography as a means of fully engaging in what is before me--to a greater degree that I would have had I not used my camera..
At other times, however, of course getting out a camera can break the feeling of being in the moment...it's all about attitude.

Last edited by guybooth (2-16-2014 2:00 PM)

 

#31 2-16-2014 2:24 PM

bonz137
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

jethanad wrote:

I take pics to collect and preserve memories.

I have used Nikon DSLr (D40, D80, D200, D70) for the past 5 years and carry two lenses most of the time, sometimes 3. I do not own expensive lenses or even an external flash. I have used a tripod only once. Prior to that I have used point-and-shoot Nikon L3 and P50.

The fondest memories I have captured have a lot to do with the moment and being ready to take the shot. So far nothing beats my D70  - the battery has never quit on me. My L3 and my P50  captured many priceless moments, but there were many occasions when I needed to replace their battery which slowed me down, they also could not take as many shots as I wanted to, in quick  succession.  I always had to have my spare batteries charged and ready for the D40, D80 and the D200. We have an iphone which takes decent snaps, but is not ready to take multiple shots quickly.

So for my next trip to Australia, I am planning on taking my D70, my 50mm lens, my 70-300mm zoom and my 18-200 zoom, no spare battery. If and when my D70 quits on me, I will be looking for another one.

I've used a Nikon D90 for several years now. The battery does indeed last a long time, but I always bring along a spare. I don't usually have to travel with a charger since I'm rarely gone for more than 10 days at the time. I chose a Nikon over other brands because, at the time, it got much better reviews for low light. That way I don't have to worry about using a flash. I keep a 200mm zoom with uv filter on it. It is a little heavy and I'm really rough with it. I tend to just throw it in my day pack or use my camera bag as a day pack. Sometimes I bring a macro lens if I know I'm going a lot of flowers or small stuff. I will bring a tripod when I do local day trips to DC or similar so I can set the timer and be in the photo. I also always have a waterproof (currently Olympus Tough) in my pocket. It does not take great quality pictures and it is slow (compared to the DSLR) but I can take it anywhere and not worry about it getting wet or crushed.

 

#32 2-16-2014 7:34 PM

jwb82
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Perth, Australia
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

My camera has certainly seen some sites over the years. Earlier trips were done with a Canon PnS but then upgraded to to 7D, usually have a 35mm f/1.4, 17-70 f/2.8 - 4 and 100mm f/2 in my bag when I wander about.

But after a lot of hiking in Nepal getting kind of sick of lugging it around, but like the level of control for full manual so I am thinking of getting a EOS-M mirrorless for future travels but haven't committed yet.

Also just brought a Canon underwater camera for this weeks snorkeling activities in the Gili's which I am looking forward to trying out!

 

#33 2-16-2014 11:18 PM

mosted
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

Canon EOS 60D + some lenses and a Nikon digicam, which isnt really good.

 

#34 2-18-2014 9:08 AM

saltycoco
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

I started off with a Canon G11, then moved up to a Canon 60D. I sold my Canon 60D and G11 last year because I needed the money so badly to get my car fixed.

I really liked DSLR photography, and they really do take good pictures if you know what you're doing.  but I enjoy traveling light now, especially more so during long multi-day hikes which I like to do where carrying a DSLR is too much of a hassle. When I get my tax refund I'll look into getting a smaller camera gear for travel. I remember the G11 took some pretty amazing pictures when I had it.

 

#35 2-18-2014 9:30 AM

guybooth
Lagos, Nigeria
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

saltycoco wrote:

I really liked DSLR photography, and they really do take good pictures if you know what you're doing.  but I enjoy traveling light now, especially more so during long multi-day hikes which I like to do where carrying a DSLR is too much of a hassle. .

Hey Salty, that's why mirrorless cameras are the way to go -- you get DSLR quality in a much smaller and lighter unit. I too would not want the hassle of hiking with a DSLR, but with a mirrorlress camera it's not a problem. I get the camera with 4 lenses and filters into a bumbag. The equivalent DSLR set-up would fill a small backpack.

 

#36 3-3-2014 11:49 PM

guybooth
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

swaroopa wrote:

My photography equipment while traveling is Canon camera, this i got it from US, having 18 mega pixel. But i am planning to buy a video camera with good features. Suggestions from anyone acceptable.

Thank you.

how much money do you want to spend? You can just buy a decent camera and it will take great video too. In fact the only reason most cameras can't be sold as video cameras is a video camera as defined as being able to film for more than 30 consecutive minutes. They build an artificial limit of 29 minutes into 'cameras' so there is a 'pretend' between a video camera and a camera - that way people are tricked into buying both!

 

#37 3-11-2014 3:53 PM

JimGreulich
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Portland, Oregon
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

My current setup:

- Canon 6d
- Canon 5d MII
- Canon SX230 HS
- Canon Lenses:  24-105L, 18-40L, 75-300 IS USM
- Manfrotto Carbon Fiber Tripod
- 3 remote shutter releases, 6 extra batteries, and a ton of memory cards wink

The 6d is new... I needed a "backup" body as I will be spending a month in Europe this summer and didn't want to take any chances that my 5d M2 would break down, in which case i would have have to spend a ton of time and money renting a body in every city I traveled to.  However, this will probably end up being my primary body over the 5d since it's got a better sensor, better low light & high ISO performance, and built in GPS tagging.  Previously, I had used my SX230 to pseudo tag every location I shot in so I wouldn't forget after returning home. That extra step will be eliminated now with the 6d smile

 

#38 4-19-2014 4:10 PM

fivepointpalm
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

my standard equipment:

- my camera (canon 7d...great camera)
- 2 lenses (1 tele lens 70-200mm [for portaits and street photography], and 1 wideangle lens  [for tall buildings, city scapes, landscapes])
- 1 blackrapid strap (you can carry you camera around your waist...so much more confortable than the usual small camstrap)
- 1 monopod (i like filming and keep the video steady)
- 2 batteries
- my iphone for quick shots to share with my friends on family while abroad (instagram?)

wink

anyone who's interested...my blog:
www.thesceneends.com

 

#39 4-20-2014 1:50 AM

annielf
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

Canon EOS Rebel T2i.  While we lived in Uganda I got really sick and tired of missing shots due to my point and shoot being so slow and the batteries not having a long enough charge.

I did learn how to use my dSLR but I'm not a pro.  The only time I use it on automatic is when I'm shooting wildlife or people who are moving unpredictably.  I've got some great shots using the Sports setting with my 300mm lens. 

Yes, it is a major PITA to carry around, especially when luggage weight/size is limited.

Wildlife pics:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/anniedann … 714349695/

Last edited by annielf (4-20-2014 1:52 AM)

 

#40 4-21-2014 12:47 AM

esvobod
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

I use Sony Cyber Shot - compact, but nice photos.

 

#41 4-21-2014 12:50 AM

esvobod
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

djapa wrote:

Only Samsung galaxy SII ...

Are you really using only your SII?
I use it only as a second option.

 

#42 5-3-2014 11:21 PM

pealausanne
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

Hello Dario,

The D800 is an awsome camera.
Someone mentioned the Sony which has the same sensor. Yes it has the same specs. But the electronics behind make a huge difference and this is one of the strength of Nikon (with robustness and optics of course). Also you would need to change lenses.
The issue with those sensors is the number of pixels. I would rather go for a D610 (still full frame) but less pixels. On a D800, you cannot make any mistake at all or you will see it on the image!

I had personnally a D300 for travelling with a 18-200. I will buy a new one soon. I will not travel with a telezoon anymore as I noticed that I was not using it so often.

I would like to have a replacement of the D300 due to the additional 1.5x factor of the DX sensors. It is nice for travelling.

 

#43 5-26-2014 3:35 AM

stefmuts
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

My Canon EOS, some lenses and stuf, and my phone (!)
I'm the one with the big camerabag taking pictures with her phone, well, not all the time but i noticed people looking weird at me when i do

 

#44 5-27-2014 12:00 AM

toska
Weimar, Germany
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

I have Olympus-EP3 with beautiful photos but sometimes it's too heavy so sometimes I took my Lumix instead.
Plus my smartphone 13mpx is quite decent for uploading to social network.

Does anyone here have Canon Powershot N?

 

#45 5-27-2014 12:19 AM

mosted
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

By the way: I really love the photo backpacks for travelling. There is so much space in it, its really perfect for travel...just a little heavy depending on what you carry. I bought one by Tamrac for around 60€ 8 years ago - 8 years!!! And its still like a new one, nothing got broken its great quality. But now they are much more expensive.

 

#46 5-27-2014 9:55 AM

thnikkamax
Max (Mario)
Los Angeles, California
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

I never take all of these, but I mix and match depending on: length of stay, total time walking around with camera equipment, is it a safe destination, etc.

DSLR: Pentax K-5 IIs utilizing an autofocus 50mm f/1.8, or vintage Asahi manual 50mm f/1.4 for amazing night shots, and whatever zoom lens fits the bag at the end (I find myself using the 50mms the most).
SLR 35mm: Pentax LX when I'm going somewhere safe, Pentax ME or ME Super when I don't care about theft (I have 3 bodies I've found in thrifts)
Point & Shoot Digital: Nikon S9100.. older, but does the job and a great pocket camera with 18x optical zoom.
Point & Shoot 35mm: Olympus Mju Zoom 105
Rangefinder: Konica Auto S3, or Olympus XA.. usually it's the XA
Polaroid: Automatic Land Camera 450.. my favorite camera to bring because of the beautiful prints it generates, although it's a metal one so it's heavy.
Mobile: Nokia Lumia 1020 with the extended battery camera grip (best mobile accessory ever!), iPhone 5c (work phone, but comes in handy), and iPad mini for editing/uploading.
Tripods: Cheap generic travel tripod with extendable legs (36" total height), 54" monopod, and a Gorillapod.
Backpack: SwissGear messenger-style bag, very convenient to swing it around from your back/side to your front and pull equipment out of it while on the go.

Like I said, I don't bring all of this with me, and I don't think I have ever carried one from each category. These are just my options to choose from when traveling.

 

#47 6-3-2014 2:44 AM

travelhog164
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

My photography equipment, my IPhone 5 and any other phone that we have with us, though we do have a camera, but I've got lazy and prefer to use my phone and put it straight onto social media or email to family.

 

#48 6-3-2014 4:50 AM

dariopaquit
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

Thanks for your feedback of my post! i just Got my new D610 replacement for my d7k. My first option to buy is nikon d800 but 36mgpixel is to heavy for me. i rent and test both this camera is nothing much different except the weight. the d610 is excellent specially the natural color tone. my dx lens 17-55 nikon is working great on this camera. the button is almost the same on my old d7k. and it is faster than the d800. love this camera.

pealausanne wrote:

Hello Dario,

The D800 is an awsome camera.
Someone mentioned the Sony which has the same sensor. Yes it has the same specs. But the electronics behind make a huge difference and this is one of the strength of Nikon (with robustness and optics of course). Also you would need to change lenses.
The issue with those sensors is the number of pixels. I would rather go for a D610 (still full frame) but less pixels. On a D800, you cannot make any mistake at all or you will see it on the image!

I had personnally a D300 for travelling with a 18-200. I will buy a new one soon. I will not travel with a telezoon anymore as I noticed that I was not using it so often.

I would like to have a replacement of the D300 due to the additional 1.5x factor of the DX sensors. It is nice for travelling.

 

#49 6-6-2014 1:32 AM

guybooth
Lagos, Nigeria
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

I just ordered a Sony a7r (I have a Sony NEX 7, which I love, but now they have brought out the a7r--wow!)
The a7r is half the size and weight of a D800, with identical image quality (if not superior in some respects) and it's less expensive.  It's not quite as fast as the D800, but I don't take high speed action shots anyhow - landscapes are my thing.

As I've said many times, DSLRs are on the way out (don't take my word for it, numerous professional photographers are now saying that... http://www.stuckincustoms.com/2012/01/0 … he-future/ Trey Radcliff, who has the most popular travel photograpy blog on the internet, has just given up Nikon for Sony. http://www.stuckincustoms.com/2013/07/0 … -nikon-vs/   

Mirrorless cameras now produce the same image quality as high-end DSLRs, but the bodies are half the size and weight, and the lenses often even less than that. So why would you buy a DSLR?
(Ok, if you are a fast action-sports photographer, you might want a DSLR for the moment - but with the rapid advances in technology, mirrorless systems are going to be equal in speed in a year or two - and then it's totally goodbye DSLRs - EDIT: I've read some conflicting reports on the a7r speed - some reviews are saying it actually quite fast anyhow - others say not - I guess it depends on light and situation + auto focus demand).

The a7r isn't perfect (no camera is, or ever will be) but I'm far better off investing in lenses for the mirrorless system and swapping them in the future to even better bodies (though I really don't think I'll ever need anything better than the 36 megapixal full frame sensor on the a7r)...either way, there is just no point these days buying lenses for the old, big and heavy DSLR technology.

Why carry around a daypack full of lens and bodies and kilograms, when you can now produce the same quality image with all your light weight gear in a waist bag?

Last edited by guybooth (6-6-2014 9:37 PM)

 

#50 6-6-2014 3:24 AM

guybooth
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Re: What is your Travel Photography Equipment?

For anyone considering a pricy investment in a high-end camera (they are really only worth it if photography is a passion for you)  please don't buy a DSLR! You can find arguments for and against any camera if you look on the web, but here's an interesting review from Camera Labs about comparative testing of the Sony a7r and the Nikon D800

http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Sony_ … dict.shtml
"I'll cut straight to the chase: the Sony Alpha A7r is one of the most impressive and exciting cameras I've ever tested. This is a camera which delivers the quality of the Nikon D800e in a body which weighs half as much and costs almost one third less.

Starting at the lowest ISO sensitivities, both cameras are capturing similar levels of detail, but the A7r is noticeably sharper. Taking lenses out of the equation, the A7r's JPEGs also enjoy lower noise at mid to high sensitivities. So this is great news for anyone wanting to match or beat the quality of the D800e with the benefit of a much smaller and lighter combination.

The A7 and A7r are essentially matching the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and Nikon D800e respectively in RAW, and beating them if you're comparing out-of-camera JPEGs. In terms of speed, the A7 shoots only 1fps slower than the 5D3 and the A7r matches the continuous speed of the D800e. Crucially both Sony bodies are considerably smaller, lighter and cheaper than their DSLR rivals too, while additionally offering a number of useful features they don't.

I sighted the absence of full-frame models with AF as what's holding photographers back from dumping their DSLRs and adopting mirror less. Well Sony's now removed that barrier."

http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/andrewtitle.png

Why would anyone buy the much larger Nikon when it's also a lot more expensive, and according to laboratory and field tests, it doesn't produce better quality images than the smaller, cheaper Sony?

DSLRs are on the way out...would you buy a record player after the technology has moved onto mp3s?

Last edited by guybooth (6-6-2014 4:00 AM)

 
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