Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum

  based on 2 reviews   write a review

113, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum Phnom Penh Reviews

shavy shavy
199 reviews
Horrible place Feb 21, 2017
The museum building once used as High School for youth in Phnom Penh but that quickly changed when the Khmer Rouge came to power. People were slaughtered in the most gruesome ways, you see pictures of the many victims. You see how prisoners were chained to the ground with chains or in tiny cells were crammed with multiple people

This museum is also known as the Museum of Genocide. Tuol Sleng was in the period 1975-1979 one of the most notorious prisons and execution sites of the Khmer Rouge. Tuol Sleng consisted of four large buildings where the prisoners were confined.

This four buildings are block A,B,C and D. In block D hang nowadays paintings depicting the torture of the Khmer Rouge. A paintings by one of the seven survivors. One of the classrooms in school were converted into cells and interrogation rooms, all windows were protected by iron grills and stimulus act and the whole complex was surrounded by electric fence

When the Khmer Rouge came to power, they turned this school into a primitive prison and torture chamber called S21. The school is just as equipped as the Khmer Rouge had decorated the prison. However, it is evident that the prison was a school in the first place. Classrooms were converted into prison

Cells with different degrees of (luxury). Some classrooms serve as a single cell, but some rooms are divided into dozens of small booths where people also were captured. Nowadays, it serves as the prison museum and a memorial to the thousands of Cambodians killed by the Khmer Rouge regime. Hang many impressive photos of victims on the walls and the chilly atmosphere in the former classroom cells gives you goosebumps

You also find a room in Tuol Sleng Museum where thousands of pictures hang of all prisoners. When someone was arrested and brought to Tuol Sleng, a photo was taken frist. Then written a comprehensive biography about the life of that person where as many names of family members and friends were noted. Then they had to give up all their clothes and possessions. Then they were taken to their cells. Seeing this photos puts you indeed quite of thinking and that this victims the has no choices. The things you see there seem incomprehensible
Tuol Sleng Compound
One of four buildings
Torture room
Torture room
Link
Join TravBuddy to leave comments, meet new friends and share travel tips!
gingerbatik gingerba…
492 reviews
S 21 Jun 24, 2013
I do not like this place as it give me creep, shiver and bad vibes all around. This museum was used as a Security Prison 21 (S-21) during the Khmer Rouge regime from the 1975 to 1979 and have at least 20,000 prisoners killed in this place, although the real number is unknow. The prisoners were repeatedly tortured and coerced into naming family members and close associates, who were in turn arrested, tortured and killed.

The buildings were enclosed in electrified barbed wire, the classrooms converted into tiny prison and torture chambers, and all windows were covered with iron bars and barbed wire to prevent escapes. The museum located at a former high school called Chao Ponhea Yat High School, named after a royal ancestor of King Norodom Sihanouk.

There are photographs and story left behind and if you wants full details of the story, you can request a guide with a fee at the entrance gate or ticket office.
the prisoner room
the building
the prisoner room
the garden
4 / 4 TravBuddies found this review helpful/trustworthy
Link
rsvpme says:
Powerful review.....journalism well done !~
Posted on: Sep 11, 2013
Cho says:
What a terrible event in that country, and it was not too long ago too. When I was in Cambodia a man told me that while all the atrocities were going on, the UN and Western countries didn't do anything to help the people there. Same thing in Rwanda.
Posted on: Sep 11, 2013

Check Phnom Penh Hotel Deals

Check-in:
Check-out:
Guests:
Rooms:
Phnom Penh Map
1 review - $44
Phnom Penh
photo by: terminalfunk