Museo Dominicano de Arte Fray Pedro Bedón

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Santo Domingo, Quito, Ecuador
(02) 228-0518
Museo Dominicano de Arte Fray Pedro Bedón - In the museum
Museo Dominicano de Arte Fray Pedro Bedón - Another view from the cloisters
Museo Dominicano de Arte Fray Pedro Bedón - Painting from 1933
Museo Dominicano de Arte Fray Pedro Bedón - In the museum
Museo Dominicano de Arte Fray Pedro Bedón - The refrectory
Museo Dominicano de Arte Fray Pedro Bedón - Cloisters of Santo Domingo

Museo Dominicano de Arte Fray Pedro Bedón Quito Reviews

Toonsarah Toonsarah
393 reviews
In the monastery of Santo Domingo Oct 25, 2012
The Museo Domenicano de Arte in the monastery of Santo Domingo may be smaller than the Museo Fray Pedro Gocial attached to Iglesia San Francisco, but it is well worth a visit. In some ways I liked it more – perhaps because there were fewer exhibits and it was therefore easier to take them in; perhaps because the leaflet we were given gave us a good explanation in English of a few of the more noted pieces; perhaps because photography is allowed; but probably because we had the opportunity here to see more than just the museum itself.

But let’s start with the museum. We came here first thing in the morning and were the only visitors. The entrance fee of $2 included the brief leaflet, in Spanish and English, mentioned above. We were offered a guide but declined as we wanted to look round at our own pace. The guy who sold us the ticket told us we were allowed to take photos, without flash naturally, and walked with us to the room off the cloister where the treasures are displayed, which he unlocked for us. We spent some time in the short series of rooms. Among the treasures on display are:

~ a huge hymn book, dating from 1681 and made from parchment, leather and wood

~ an 18th century painting of the Virgin of the Rosary, by an anonymous artist of the Cuzco school

~ various wooden statues of saints from the 17th and 18th centuries, very realistic in their portrayal

When we had finished looking around here, we took some time to enjoy the peaceful cloister where more paintings were displayed, some of them looking decided more modern but not described in our leaflet. As we went to leave the same guy who had sold us the tickets asked if we would like to see the original monastery refectory. We said that we would, so he locked up the museum (there were still no other visitors) and took us to the far corner of the cloister where he unlocked a door that led through the next cloister. This is currently part of the school for boys run by the monks, but he explained that the building works that we could see going on were being carried out to turn another part of the monastery into the school and open this part up to the public, thus extending the museum. He then opened another door and we were in the refectory. This was really worth seeing – a large room beautifully decorated, with seating along the edges. Each of the 54 seats has a painting of one of the Dominican martyrs, along with the cause of their demise – some stabbed, some stoned, one shot by arrows and so on. As a contrast to these rather grizzly images, the ceiling has beautiful paintings depicting the life of St Catherine, from her birth at one end to old age at the other. Our guide pointed out that some had been restored and were consequently much richer in colour. The room is apparently still in use – hired out by the monks for special events, and used by themselves on feast days.

Back in the cloister I asked our guide about the more modern paintings we had seen, and one in particular that had intrigued me. He explained that it had been painted in 1933 by a Dominican monk and artist, and showed the establishment, in Guayaquil, of Ecuador’s first trade union – see my photo attached. You can see people practicing their various trades and crafts, gathered around Jesus in his guise as a carpenter, with his father Joseph, also of course a carpenter, behind him. On the right a Dominican brother leads more workers to join the union, and in the background is the busy port of the city, a hive of industry and activity.
Cloisters of Santo Domingo
The refrectory
In the museum
Painting from 1933
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