Gibbonsville Travel Guide

Browse 1 travel reviews, travel blogs and 4 travel photos from real travelers to Gibbonsville.

Gibbonsville Overview

Gibbonsville is a tiny town of about 53 (down 4% since 2000) located along U. S. Highway 93 in Lemhi County in Central Idaho. Gibbonsville began around 1870 and was named for Colonel John Gibbon, who served in the area during the Nez Perce conflict in 1877. The area had some habitation by Indian tribes for many years, then between 2 and 5 September 1805, Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery were in this area looking for an easier passage through the rugged Idaho Mountains. Eventually they went over the mountains to the Bitterroot Valley on the other side. While making this transit they had their first contact with the Flathead Indians who spoke a language "stranger than any they had heard". In 1877, a major lode of gold was discovered in the area. In 1878, Gibbonsville Merchant Jeremiah Fahey built a wagon road (which followed a similar route as U. S. Highway 93) from Gibbonsville to Montana which met up with a Utah and Northern Railway terminal. There are still remnants and evidence of the old Fahey Wagon Road along the highway. British investment in 1880, the wagon road, and an influx of miners and other pioneers, enables Gibbonsville to grow rapidly and produce over 2 million dollars’ worth of gold ore by 1899. After the mining profits dwindled so did the population. Today Gibbonsville is a tiny town in a very beautiful area.