Dadaocheng Wharf

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Taipei, Taiwan

Dadaocheng Wharf Taipei Reviews

davejo davejo
270 reviews
Pass through Dadaocheng Gate and you are in a different world Feb 07, 2017
While visiting Dihua Street you should take the opportunity to visit Dadaocheng Wharf which is only 200 meters away on the river. The wharf is approached by going through a huge gate, Dadaocheng Gate where you can see the river. The gate allows for cars, scooters and pedestrians to enter the wharf area which seems like you are no longer in Taipei as the river stretches before you. Dadaocheng was originally settled by Pingpu people after a fight with their neighbours in Mengjia (Wanhua District). Back in those days Taipei consisted of many little villages with different groups of people occupying each village. Over the years Dadaocheng developed as houses and shops were built, eventually becoming an important port on the Tamsui River where tea and cloth were traded in this commercial area. Nowadays Dadaocheng has become something of a tourist attraction and many locals hang out there in the late afternoon and early evening.

Just after you have passed through the gate to Dadaocheng Wharf turn round and look at the graffiti on the walls. It looks as if the graffiti are scenes from the distant past if you notice the clothing that the people are wearing. The houses are probably those that were in the area of Dadaocheng.

The area of Dadaocheng and the wharf is being renovated and cleaned up to attract tourists and locals alike. A bike path has been put in and there are quite a few sculptures on the wharf. Unfortunate;y there was nothing in English regarding the sculptures so i have no idea how long they have been there and who was responsible, but it is certainly pleasing to the eyes while walking around.
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