Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola.

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Elandstraat 194, The Hague, Netherlands
(070) 364 99 26
Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola. - Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola, Den Haag.
Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola. - Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola, Den Haag.
Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola. - Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola, Den Haag.
Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola. - Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola, Den Haag.

Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola. The Hague Reviews

planxty planxty
117 reviews
A very fine building. Apr 08, 2017
On my first morning's walking in Den Haag my attention was caught by the twin spires of what appeared to be a fairly large church near my hotel. When I eventually got there I discovered that it was the Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola. I had heard of the man but knew absolutely nothing about him and it was only whilst reserarching this review that I discovered what a fascinating character he was. At the risk of becoming repetitive, I really do learn so much whilst writing about my various jaunts.

Ignacio (also rendered Inigo) López was born in 1491 in Spain in a small village called Loyola (now Laiola). When aged seven his Mother died and he was raised by the local blacksmith's wife whereupon he was given the surname of the village of his birth.

After a brief period in public service he became a soldier at age 18 and soon gained something of a reputation not least for being fond of the practice of duelling at which he excelled. He fought in the service of Duke of Najera but had the misfortune to be hit in the leg by a cannonball during the Battle of Pamplona which resulted in a partial amputation of the limb leaving him thereafter with a pronounced limp. During his protracted recovery he took to reading and about the only books he could obtain were of a religious nature which prompted him to change from his now finished military career to becoming a religious man. He symbolically laid down his arms in frony of a statue of the Black Madonna and proceeded to walk, or more properly limp, to the town of Manresa where he begged and did menial work for his keep.

After a brief pilgrimage to the Holy Land he returned to begin an education which he had not previously had. He went North to study at the University of Paris and eventually got his Master's degree at the goodly age of 44. Whilst at University he roomed with Peter Faber and Francis Xavier and, along with some others, they formed a religious grouping styling themselves "Friends in the Lord". Eventually some of them presented themselves to the Pope in Rome and were accepted as a religious order known as the Society of Jesus or more popularly the Jesuits now. The Society began to specialise in education which it does to this day.

Ignatius died on on July 31st, 1556 and this date is now his feast day. He was later beatified and eventually canonised in 1622. Amongst other things he is the patron saint of soldiers which I suppose is understandable.

The Church itself is a comparatively new building having only been consecrated in 1892 which was only one year before my maternal grandmother was born! It is very impressive inside with a high ceiling and some very aesthetically pleasing stained glasswork behind the altar. I mentioned at the beginning of this review that it was the twin spires that initially caught my eye and I have now discovered they are 236 feet high.

It really is worth a visit if you are in the area.
Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola, …
Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola, …
Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola, …
Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola, …
2 / 2 TravBuddies found this review helpful/trustworthy
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MalenaN says:
Interesting story! I agree with you, that one learn a lot while researching for a review. But I have not done so much review writing lately!
Posted on: Apr 20, 2017
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